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St Catherine's Care Home Requires improvement

We are carrying out checks at St Catherine's Care Home. We will publish a report when our check is complete.

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Requires improvement

Updated 25 January 2018

St Catherine’s Care Home Horwich, Bolton is a purpose built two storey care home. The home is close to Horwich town centre and close to a bus route and the motorway network. The home provides nursing care for 30 people and care for 30 people living with dementia in a separate area of the home called Pike View.

This inspection took place on 07 December 2017 and was unannounced. The last inspection took place on 10 January 2017 and the overall rating was good.

St Catherine’s is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

The service had registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At this inspection we found seven breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. These were in relation to medication, infection control, governance, staff training, mitigating risk, person centred care and dignity. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.’ Please note that the summary section will be used to populate the CQC website. Providers will be asked to share this section with the people who use their service and the staff that work there.

Systems were in place to ensure staff were safely recruited. Staff told us they received the training and supervision they needed to be able to carry out their roles effectively. Staff completed an induction on commencing work at the home.

The training record provided by the registered manager highlighted there were gaps in essential training for staff.

People who used the service and their relatives told us they felt safe and their relatives were well cared for.

We found that medicines were not managed safely and people did not always get their medicines in a timely manner.

We found that the home was not clean and systems were not being adhered to reduce the risk of cross infection in the home.

Health and safety checks were in place with regard to equipment and servicing of appliances.

The service was working within the legal requirements of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) (MCA) and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

People who used the service told us staff were kind and caring. We observed staff interacted well with people throughout the day. People’s privacy was respected. However, people’s dignity was not always maintained. For example it was noted that faeces was on bedding and mattresses in people’s rooms when beds had been made and not cleaned.

We saw a good range of information in care plans, including care plans for pressure ulcers and wound care. These were not all completed accurately and fully. Care plans had been reviewed as required.

There was a range of activities provided both in the home and trips out to local venues

The service had an up to date complaints procedure for receiving, handling and responding to complaints.

A service user guide was available. This provided information about the home and the care people could expect to receive.

Inspection areas

Safe

Inadequate

Updated 25 January 2018

The service was not safe.

People told us they felt safe living at the home. The home was not clean and infection control was poor.

Staff had been safely recruited Safeguarding .policies and procedures were in place. Staff had received training and were confident to report any concerns.

Medicines were not got given in a safe and timely manner and recorded as required.

Effective

Requires improvement

Updated 25 January 2018

The service was not always effective.

We saw that a detailed assessment was completed before people were accepted to the service.

Staff received the induction, training gaps in training and supervision they required to be able to provide safe and effective care.

The service was working within the legal requirements of the Mental Health Act (2005) MCA) and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) .

Caring

Requires improvement

Updated 25 January 2018

The service was not consistently caring.

People who used the service told us staff were kind and caring. We observed staff interacted well with people throughout the day. People’s privacy was respected.

People’s dignity was not always maintained.

There was a service user guide given to prospective service users and their families.

Responsive

Requires improvement

Updated 25 January 2018

The service was not responsive.

People were encouraged to provide feedback on the service they received. Any complaints or suggestions were acted upon to help improve people’s experience of the service.

We looked at the care records for nine people who used the service. We noted these contained detailed information regarding people’s health and social care needs. However, we found that for one person there was no care plans and we found that several charts had not been completed.

People’s end of life wishes were recorded.

There was a range of activities provided both in the home and trips out to local venues

Well-led

Requires improvement

Updated 25 January 2018

The service was not consistently well-led.

The service had a manager who was registered with the Care Quality Commission and was qualified to undertake the role.

People told us that they felt the manager was approachable and staff felt supported by the manager

Basic quality assurance systems and checks were in place to monitor and assess the quality of the service.