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Inspection carried out on 17 April 2018

During a routine inspection

The Next Step Trust is a domiciliary care service. It provides personal care to people living in their own home. It provides a service to adults with learning disabilities who attend their day centre. At the time of the inspection two people were receiving a service.

At our last inspection we rated the service good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and on-going monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

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This inspection took place on 17 and 18 April 2018 and was announced which meant the provider knew we would be visiting.

A registered manager was in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Everyone we spoke with was confident the service was safe. Systems were in place to make sure risk was assessed and managed. Staffing arrangements were appropriate and ensured people received care from a consistent workforce. Staff did not administer tablets or liquid medication but they did apply prescribed topical creams. People did not have care plans for this aspect of care but once we brought it to attention of the registered manager they took prompt action to rectify this.

Staff received training and supervision which ensured they understood their role and responsibilities. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. People’s nutritional and health needs were met by the main carers. Staff at The Next Step Trust passed on relevant information to ensure any health issues were managed.

People’s care records were person centred. Staff knew people very well and staff told us this contributed to the high standard of service people received. Relatives were complimentary about the service provided by the Next Step Trust and told us the standard of care was very good. They told us all staff were kind and caring.

People’s care was planned and delivered in a way that met their needs. Relatives we spoke with said they did not have any concerns about the service and would feel comfortable raising any issues with the support workers or the management team.

The service was well led. The registered manager was knowledgeable about the day to day running of the service as well as their overall legal responsibilities. They were supported by an effective management team. The provider had systems in place to monitor the quality of the service and people were encouraged to share their views to help drive improvement.

Further information is in the detailed findings below.

Inspection carried out on 12 January 2016

During a routine inspection

The Next Step Trust is a registered charity established in 2006 to support adults with learning disabilities and complex health needs. The Trust was registered with the Commission in 2014 and only provides domiciliary care service to people who attend the day centre managed by the same organisation. At the time of the inspection the agency provided care and support to two people in their own homes. This was the first inspection of the service.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The registered manager told us that sufficient care staff were employed for operational purposes and all new staff shadowed a more experienced member of staff until they felt confident and competent to work alone. The staff training matrix was up to date and we saw one to one supervision meetings took place to support staff to carry out their roles effectively.

The staff we spoke with were able to describe how individual people preferred their care and support to be delivered and the importance of treating people with respect in their own homes. The relatives of people who used the service told us staff were very caring and always provided care and support in line with their agreed support plan.

The support plans we looked at were person centred and were reviewed on a regular basis to make sure they provided accurate and up to date information. The staff we spoke with told us they used the support plans as working documents and that they provided sufficient information to enable them to carry out their role effectively and in people's best interest.

There was a complaints procedure available which enabled people to raise any concerns or complaints about the care or support they received. The people we spoke with told us they were aware of the complaints procedure and would have no hesitation in making a formal complaint if they had any concerns about the standard of care provided.

There was a quality assurance monitoring system in place that was designed to continually monitor and identified shortfalls in service provision. Audit results were analysed for themes and trends and there was evidence that learning from incidents took place and appropriate changes were made to procedures or work practices if required.