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Champions Place Requires improvement

We are carrying out a review of quality at Champions Place. We will publish a report when our review is complete. Find out more about our inspection reports.

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Requires improvement

Updated 20 December 2018

We carried out this unannounced inspection of Champions Place on 6 December 2018. Champions Place is registered to provide accommodation with personal care for up to 14 people with a physical or learning disability. At the time of our visit 11 people lived at the service.

This service was set up and registered prior to Building the Right Support and Registering the Right Support and it is not the type or size of service we would be registering if the application to register was made to CQC today. This is because it does not conform to the guidance as it is very difficult for large services for people with autism to meet the standards.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The registered manager assisted us with our inspection.

We last inspected Champions Place in May 2018 when we rated the service Inadequate. This was because we found restrictive, institutionalised practices taking place and a lack of respect being shown to people. There were insufficient staff to care for people and a failure to recognise incidents of abuse. Poor medicines management practices were taking place and there was a lack of information about potential risks to people. People’s care plans did not demonstrate person-centred care planning and the management oversight of the service was not robust. In addition, we found the registered manager was not meeting the requirements of registration as they had failed to notify us of significant incidents.

Following this inspection, we placed the service into Special Measures and we asked the registered provider to send us an action plan to demonstrate how they planned to address the shortfalls. We carried out this inspection to check that they had taken the appropriate steps to follow their action plan. We found significant improvements in the service overall and it was clear from people’s behaviours that they were more relaxed and happy living at Champions Place.

Processes in relation to medicines management had improved, however we identified some shortfalls that required further work. Although improvement was seen in following the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005, further work was needed to ensure that legal guidelines were being adhered to.

People were cared for by staff who showed a kind, caring, attentive and respectful approach towards them. People were encouraged in their independence, making their own decisions and supported to maintain relationships that were important to them.

People were being cared for by a sufficient number of staff who had been recruited through an appropriate process. People were protected from the potential risk of harm or abuse as staff were aware of their responsibilities in this respect and there was guidance in place for staff. In the event people had an accident or incident, this was recorded and appropriate action taken in response.

People lived in an environment that was checked for its safety and was clean and suitable for people’s needs. People’s needs were assessed and reviewed and where they required the input of a healthcare professional, this was provided for them.

Staff were competent in their role and worked well together as a team. They had access to training and supervision.

People could choose their favourite foods and they were encouraged to be more independent during mealtimes. Where people had specific dietary requirements, these were recognised and appropriate action taken.

Person-centred care planning had improved. There was a new care plan format in place which was a work in progress and information around people’s end of life wishes needed to be included.

People had the opportunity to access more activities in line with

Inspection areas

Safe

Requires improvement

Updated 20 December 2018

The service was not consistently safe.

Medicines processes had improved, however we found further work was needed to ensure the service was meeting the regulations.

People received care from a sufficient number of staff.

Risks to people had been identified and guidance given to staff on how to manage these risks. Staff were aware of their responsibilities in relation to reporting abuse.

Robust recruitment processes were in place and staff were aware of processes in relation to good infection control and fire safety.

Accidents and incidents were recorded.

Effective

Requires improvement

Updated 20 December 2018

The service was not consistently effective.

Staff did not always follow the legal requirements in relation to consent.

People were encouraged to make their own decisions in relation to the food they ate.

People lived in an environment that was suitable for them and they received care from staff who had access to training and supervision.

People were supported to see a healthcare professional if they needed to.

Staff worked together well as a team to help ensure people received effective care.

Caring

Requires improvement

Updated 20 December 2018

The service was caring however improvements needed to be embedded into daily practice.

People received care from staff who showed them kindness and attention.

People were supported to be as independent as possible.

People were able to have privacy if they wished and maintain relationships with people who were close to them. Staff treated people with respect.

Responsive

Good

Updated 20 December 2018

The service was responsive.

Care plans had improved and were more person-centred. A new care plan format had been introduced to assist with this.

People had the opportunity to access activities of their choosing. Work was underway to help ensure new opportunities for people were opened up.

There was a complaints policy in place should anyone have any concerns.

Well-led

Requires improvement

Updated 20 December 2018

The service was well-led, however improvements needed to be embedded into daily practice.

Further improvement was needed to the quality assurance checks within the service.

The manager had a good management oversight of the service and the culture within the staff team had improved since our last inspection.

People, their relatives and staff were involved in the running of the service.

The manager had learnt from the last inspection and had worked hard to help ensure people’s care was more person-centred and individualised.

Much of the positive work that had taken place since our last inspection now needed to be sustained.

The manager worked with external agencies to help ensure people received a good level of care.