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Archived: Woodlands - Care Home Good

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Reports


Inspection carried out on 11 September 2017

During a routine inspection

This inspection was carried out on the 11 September 2017 and was unannounced.

Woodlands Care Home is part of the HICA group of homes. It is purpose built. It provides accommodation for up to 54 people some of whom may be living with dementia. At the time of this inspection there were 44 people living at the home and receiving a service.

The home is situated on the outskirts of Driffield, within walking distance of local community facilities. There are 46 bedrooms for single occupancy (15 with en-suite toilet and wash hand basin facilities) and four bedrooms for double occupancy with wash hand basin facilities. Bathrooms and toilets are shared. There is a lift to the upper floor. There are various communal areas including lounges and dining rooms for people to use. People have access to outside gardens and seating areas, which are provided in secure settings. There is car parking for staff and visitors to the front and side of the service.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The registered manager will be referred to as 'manager' throughout the report.

At the last inspection in November 2016 the overall rating for the service was Requires Improvement. This was because the provider was in breach of two Regulations under the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. The breaches were in Regulation 11 Need for consent, and Regulation 17 Good governance. We asked the provider to submit an action plan regarding the breaches identified. During this inspection we checked and found the actions were met and no further breaches were identified.

People were protected from the risk of harm or abuse because there were effective systems in place to manage any safeguarding concerns. Care workers were trained in safeguarding adults from abuse and understood their responsibilities in respect of protecting people from the risk of harm.

The service was working within the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA). Care workers understood their responsibilities under the MCA and were actively promoting people’s independence. The manager and care workers had an understanding of Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. They had made appropriate referrals to the relevant authorities to ensure people's rights were protected.

Further work was being completed by the provider to ensure that, where a relative had told the service they had a Lasting Power of Attorney, this was validated and the scope of the decision making was recorded.

Care workers were only recruited after checks had been completed to ensure they were of suitable character to work with vulnerable people. A staff dependency tool was used to ensure sufficient skilled care workers were employed to meet people’s needs. On the day of the inspection we saw that there were sufficient numbers of staff employed to meet people's individual needs.

Support plans were person centred and reflected individual's preferences. Information recorded was reviewed and evaluated as a minimum every month and more often where people’s needs changed. This meant care workers had access to up to date records that were reflective of people’s current needs.

Assessments of risk were carried out to ensure any care and support activities were safe and with minimal restrictions. Assessments were carried out around the home environment to ensure it was safe for everybody. Where any concerns were highlighted action plans were implemented and reviewed for their effectiveness.

Care workers were supported to complete training, learning and development that enabled them to fulfil the requirements of their role and meet people’s individual needs and sup

Inspection carried out on 9 November 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection was carried out on 10 and 11 November 2016 and was unannounced. This meant the registered provider and staff did not know we would be attending. The service was last inspected on 8 December 2014 and the service was found to be in breach of Regulation 15 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. The service was complaint with all other regulations at that time.

Woodlands Care Home is part of the HICA group of homes. It is purpose built. It provides accommodation for up to 54 people some of whom may be living with dementia. It is situated on the outskirts of Driffield, within walking distance of local community facilities. There are 46 bedrooms for single occupancy (15 with en-suite toilet and wash hand basin facilities) and four bedrooms for double occupancy with wash hand basin facilities. Bathrooms and toilets are shared. There are lifts to the upper floor. There are various communal areas including lounges and dining rooms for people to use.

The registered provider is required to have a registered manager in post and on the day of the inspection there was a manager registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The registered manager was able to demonstrate they had an understanding of Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) and The Court of Protection. However, we found that Mental Capacity Act (2005) guidelines were not always followed. This was a breach of Regulation 11 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014.

The registered provider had a quality assurance system in place, but the system was not effective in assessing, monitoring and improving the quality and safety of the service. We also found record keeping at the service to be inconsistent. This was a breach of Regulation 17 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014.

People had their health and social care needs assessed and care and support was planned and delivered in line with their individual care needs. Care plans were individualised to include preferences, likes and dislikes and contained detailed information about how each person should be supported. However, not all care plans were fully reflective of people’s current needs.

People enjoyed a good choice of food and drink and were provided with snacks and refreshments throughout the day. Health care professionals were consulted when concerns had been identified in respect of people's weight loss.

We saw that staff completed an induction process and they had received a wide range of training, which covered courses the home deemed essential, such as safeguarding, medication and Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA).

Staff had been employed following appropriate recruitment and selection processes. We found that staff had a good knowledge of how to keep people safe from harm. Accidents and incidents were recorded appropriately and we found that the recording and administration of medicines was being managed appropriately.

Assessments of risk had been completed for each person and plans had been put in place to minimise risks for most people. The service was clean, tidy and free from odour and effective cleaning schedules were in place.

People told us they were well cared for and we found people were supported to maintain good health and had access to services from healthcare professionals.

People were offered a variety of different activities to be involved in. People were also supported to go out of the home to access facilities in the local community.

The registered provider had a complaints policy and procedure in place and there were systems in place to se

Inspection carried out on 8 December 2014

During a routine inspection

Woodlands Care Home is part of the HICA group of homes. It is purpose built. It provides accommodation for up to 54 people some of whom may be living with dementia. It is situated on the outskirts of Driffield, within walking distance of local community facilities. There are 46 bedrooms for single occupancy (15 with en-suite toilet and wash hand basin facilities) and four bedrooms for double occupancy with wash hand basin facilities. Bathrooms and toilets are shared. There are lifts to the upper floor. There are various communal areas including lounges and dining rooms for people to use.

This inspection was unannounced and took place on 8 December 2014. During the inspection we spoke with four people who used the service, four visitors to the service, eight staff and the registered manager. At the time of our inspection there was a registered manager in place who had been in post since 2011. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The last inspection took place on 19 November 2013. At that inspection we found the provider was meeting all the essential standards that we assessed.

People who used the service and others were not protected against the risks associated with unsafe or unsuitable premises because of inadequate maintenance. There were no unpleasant odours in the home, but the upstairs corridor carpets were worn and stained. There were a number of double glazing units that had condensation trapped between the layers of glass making it difficult to see through the windows. Two stairwells were water damaged on the walls and the stair carpets were stained and dirty.

This was a breach of Regulation 15 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2010. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of this report.

People told us that they felt safe living in the service. We found that staff had a good knowledge of how to keep people safe from harm and that there were enough staff to meet people’s needs. Staff had been employed following robust recruitment and selection processes.

Care records contained assessments, which identified risks and described the measures in place to ensure the risk of harm to people was minimised. The care records we viewed also showed us that people’s health and wellbeing was monitored and referrals were made to other health professionals as appropriate.

Staff told us that they were happy with the training provided for them and the training records evidenced that staff took part in training that would equip them to carry out their roles effectively. People who used the service, relatives and health care professionals told us that staff were effective and skilled.

The staff on duty knew the people they were supporting and the choices they had made about their care and their lives. People were supported to maintain their independence and control over their lives. All of the people we spoke with said they were well cared for. They told us staff went out of their way to care for them and all said that it was a lovely place to live.

People’s nutritional needs had been assessed and they told us they were satisfied with the meals provided by the service. People had been included in planning menus and their feedback about the meals in the service had been listened to and acted on.

People and relatives were satisfied with the activities taking place within the service, although we found these did not fully meet the needs of people with dementia. Work was in progress to develop these further to include a wider range of interests and topics.

The registered manager monitored the quality of the service, supported the staff team and ensured that people who used the service were able to make suggestions and raise concerns. We saw from recent audits that the service was meeting their internal quality standards.

Inspection carried out on 21 November 2013

During a routine inspection

At the time of our visit there were 41 people residing at the service. People lived in three units. The manager explained these were referred to as the residential unit, the annexe and the unit for people with dementia.

People were asked for their consent before staff provided any support. Where people did not have capacity to consent clear protocols were in place to ensure staff worked within agreed boundaries, and in accordance with legislation.

Care records were detailed and were reviewed regularly to ensure care records accurately reflected people�s current needs. People told us they were satisfied with their care.

Staff told us that equipment used to support people was appropriate for people�s individual needs. We saw that regular checks took place to ensure equipment remained safe.

Recruitment processes ensured people were protected from the risks of being supported by unsuitable staff.

The manager explained the staffing levels in place at the service and that the needs of potential new people were assessed prior to their admission to the service to ensure their needs could be met within the staffing structure.

Staff records showed staff had received appropriate training and were supported through supervision and staff meetings.

The manager worked in accordance with the provider�s quality assurance policy to ensure they monitored the quality of the service provided.

Inspection carried out on 22 January 2013

During a routine inspection

During our inspection of Woodlands we found that people were treated with dignity and respect. They were given opportunities to be involved in planning their own care and treatment and were able to review this regularly. One person who used the service told us �I was involved in writing my plan, I am always involved in my review and they ask me if things are okay all the time�.

We observed that people were interacting with staff very positively and their care plans were detailed and person centred. People were tended to with patience and care and they reported that they were happy with the care they received. One relative told us �My relative has been a different person since coming into the home and we are very happy with the care they have received�.

We looked at safeguarding processes and procedures in place and found these to be robust. Staff understanding was good and the service was responding appropriately to incidents. The home was clean and hygienic. All areas of infection control policies were being followed effectively.

Staffing and recruitment was handled professionally and there were robust processes in place to manage this. Staffing levels were good and people reported there was always enough staff.

The home was undertaking a large amount of quality assurance and people who used the service and their relatives were given chances to participate and feedback comments. The organisational processes in place ensured that the quality of care was high.

Inspection carried out on 27 October 2011

During a routine inspection

We spoke with two people in the home and observed another two being supported by staff.

People told us they liked living at Woodlands very much, that they had everything they needed and that they liked the staff.

People told us they felt safe and would talk to a care worker or the manager if they were worried about anything.

One person told us they preferred the staff to look after their medicines and that there had never been any problems receiving it.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)