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Park House Care Home Requires improvement

Reports


Inspection carried out on 30 January 2020

During a routine inspection

About the service

Park House is a residential care home providing personal and nursing care to 36 people aged 65 and over at the time of the inspection. The service can support up to 42 people in one purpose built facility.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People were not always treated with dignity and respect. Staff were task focussed and did not always put people first.

Risk assessments and care plans didn't always contain up to date, clear information about people's current risks. Staff did not act in accordance with measures put in place to manage risk.

Systems and processes in place to monitor and improve the quality of the service were ineffective. The registered manager had not identified or acted on the issues we found during inspection.

Relatives spoke positively about staff and management. Relatives told us people were safe and they were protected by staff who understood their responsibilities and how to keep people safe.

Appropriate recruitment checks took place before staff started work and there were enough staff available to meet people's needs. Staff received comprehensive training to enable them to carry out their roles effectively. Staff were happy working for the service and felt supported by the registered manager and colleagues.

The home was well equipped, clean and tidy and good infection control practices were being followed. Further work was being considered to make the home more suited to people living with dementia.

People took part in activities they enjoyed and plans were in place to expand the range and times that activities were available. Visitors were welcomed. The home had good relationships with health and social care professionals.

People and their relatives were involved in the planning and delivery of their care, and were asked for feedback which was acted upon appropriately.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

The provider was keen to work in partnership with key organisations including the local authority to improve the service for people. Staff at the service worked with healthcare professionals to ensure good outcomes for people.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was Good (published 9 August 2017).

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Enforcement

We have identified breaches in relation to safety, dignity and respect, and governance of the service.

Please see the action we have told the provider to take at the end of this report.

Follow up

We will request an action plan from the provider to understand what they will do to improve the standards of quality and safety. We will work alongside the provider and local authority to monitor progress. We will return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 19 June 2017

During a routine inspection

Park House Care Home provides accommodation for persons who require nursing or personal care for up to 42 older people, some of whom have a diagnosis of dementia. At the time of the inspection 41 people were using the service.

At the last inspection on the 29 April and 5 May 2015 the service was rated Good. At this inspection we found that the service remained Good.

A registered manager was in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Systems were in place to identify and manage risks to people’s health and welfare. However some people cared for in bed were not always repositioned at the frequency set out in their turn charts. This increased their risks of developing pressure ulcers.

Systems were in place to keep the service safe, clean and hygienic.

Staff knew how to respond to any concerns or incidents of abuse to protect people. People’s dependency levels were regularly assessed to ensure that the appropriate number of staff available. The service’s recruitment process ensured that staff were suitably employed. Systems were in place to ensure medicines were safely managed and people received them safely.

Staff received appropriate support and training to perform their roles and responsibilities. They were provided with on-going training to update their skills and knowledge.

People’s consent to care and treatment was sought in line with current legislation. Where people’s liberty was deprived, Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) applications had been submitted and approved by the statutory body.

People were provided with a balanced diet and adequate amounts of food and drinks of their choice and supported to access health care facilities when required.

People were looked after by staff that were caring, compassionate and promoted their privacy and dignity. People’s needs were assessed and regularly reviewed. The service responded to complaints within the agreed timescale.

The service promoted a culture that was open and transparent. Quality assurance systems were in place to obtain feedback, monitor performance and manage risks.

Inspection carried out on 29 April and 5 May 2015

During a routine inspection

The inspection was unannounced and took place on 29 April and 5 May 2015.

Park House Care Home provides personal and nursing care for up to 42 older people who are physically and mentally frail some of whom may be living with dementia. There were 41 people living at the service when we visited.

The home has a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were looked after by staff who knew how to respond to allegations or incidents of abuse.

People’s dependency levels were regularly assessed to enable the appropriate number of staff to be available on duty. The service’s recruitment process ensured that staff were suitably employed.

People received their medicines at the prescribed times.

Staff received appropriate support and training to perform their roles and responsibilities. They were provided with on-going training to update their skills and knowledge.

People’s consent to care and treatment was sought in line with current legislation. Where people’s liberty was deprived, Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) applications had been submitted and approved by the statutory body.

People were provided with a balanced diet and adequate amounts of food and drinks of their choice. If required people had access to health care facilities.

People were looked after by staff who were caring, compassionate and promoted their privacy and dignity.

People’s needs were assessed and regularly reviewed. The service responded to complaints within the agreed timescale.

The service promoted a culture that was open and transparent. Quality assurance systems were in place to obtain feedback, monitor performance and manage risks.

Inspection carried out on 20 June 2013

During a routine inspection

People who used the service told us that they liked living at the home. A person who used the service we spoke with told us "The staff are really good, in fact fantastic." Another person said " I am really happy here, we had a quiz night and all the staff came."

A relative said "It was hard to have to place XXX in a home but this has been really good for him, he has perked up quite a lot since being here."

We found the home to be compliant in the regulations we examined against.

Inspection carried out on 4 January 2013

During a routine inspection

During our visit people told us that staff treated them with respect and encouraged them to make choices about their day to day life. People told us, and we heard, staff speak with them in a kind and respectful manner. A visitor we spoke with explained how the manager was always available and the staff were very good. One person who used the service told us, " the staff and management are fantastic they are so supportive and always laughing and cheerful, they keep me going." Another person who spoke with us said " staff are absolutely brilliant they work so hard, it is really nice with a lovely atmosphere"

We found that the home was a safe and caring environment for the people who used the service.

Inspection carried out on 11 November 2011

During an inspection in response to concerns

There were 41 residents living at the service when we visited on 11 November 2011. We spoke with five residents, one relative and three staff to ask for their comments and observations. We spent an hour in a communal area of the home with residents, observing their experience of care and assessing the quality of support residents received.

Residents told us they felt involved in making decisions about their care and support and the staff were very polite and friendly and would always try to respond to their requests. One resident said she liked to keep her independence by cleaning her own room and helping staff to raise money by selling raffle tickets. Another resident told us she never had any reason to complain about her care. Two residents said that they were happy and had no concerns with the staff, for example one told us, �The staff are brilliant�.