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Nayland Care Agency Limited Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 12 September 2018

Nayland Care Agency Limited is a domiciliary care agency. It provides personal care to people living in their own homes. It provides a service to adults. At the time of this announced inspection of 23 July 2018 there were 196 people who used the personal care service. We inspected the service on a Monday and announced our inspection on Friday 20 July 2018 to make sure that someone was available.

At our last inspection of 1 August 2017, the service was rated requires improvement overall. The key questions for effective and caring were rated good and the key questions safe, responsive and well-led were rated requires improvement. At this inspection we found improvements had been made and is now rated good overall.

There was no registered manager in post, the previous registered manager had left the service in March 2018. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons.’ Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Improvements had been made in how the service was led. This included improvements in their governance systems to assess and monitor the service provided to people. The service had a quality assurance system and shortfalls were identified and addressed. As a result, the quality of the service continued to improve.

Improvements had been made in how the service provided people with safe care. Risks to people were managed, including risks from abuse and in their daily lives. The service learned from incidents to improve the service. There were enough care workers to cover people’s planned care visits. A new system was in place to support the service to monitor and address missed and late visits. Recruitment of care workers was done safely. Where people required support with their medicines, this was done safely. However, an issue had arisen when a person was not receiving their medicines as required, this was immediately addressed. The risks of cross infection were minimised.

Improvements had been made in how the service provided people with responsive care. People received care and support which was assessed, planned and delivered to meet their individual needs. There were systems in place to support and care for people at the end of their lives, where required. A complaints procedure was in place and complaints were investigated and responded to and used to drive improvement.

The service continued to provide people with an effective service. People were supported by care workers who were trained and supported to meet their needs. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and care workers cared for them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. Systems were in place to support people with their dietary needs, if required. People were supported to have access to health professionals where needed. The service worked with other organisations involved in people’s care to provide a consistent service.

The service continued to provide a caring service. People had positive relationships with their care workers. People’s dignity, privacy and independence were respected and promoted. People’s views were listened to and valued.

Further information is in the detailed findings below.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 12 September 2018

The service was safe.

Improvements had been made in missed and late visits to people. There were care workers available to cover planned visits.

There were systems in place to support people with their medicines, as required.

There were systems in place to reduce the risks to people from abuse and avoidable harm.

Effective

Good

Updated 12 September 2018

The service was effective.

Staff were trained and supported to meet the needs of the people who used the service.

The service understood the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

Where people requires support with their dietary needs, their nutritional needs were assessed and professional advice and support was obtained for people when needed.

People were supported to maintain good health and had access to appropriate services which ensured they received ongoing healthcare support.

Caring

Good

Updated 12 September 2018

The service was caring.

People were treated with respect and their privacy and independence was promoted and respected.

People�s choices were respected and listened to.

Responsive

Good

Updated 12 September 2018

The service was responsive.

People�s needs were assessed, planned for and met. People�s end of life decisions were documented.

There was a system in place to manage people�s complaints.

Well-led

Good

Updated 12 September 2018

The service was well-led.

Improvements had been made in how the service assessed and monitored the service provided to people. These quality assurance systems supported the managing director to identify and address shortfalls.