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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 13 July 2017

The Queen Alexandra Hospital Home is a nursing home which provides a multi-disciplinary approach to care and rehabilitation of people with neurological and medical disabilities, predominantly, but not exclusively, to people who have served with HM Forces or who had relatives in the forces. The service is registered to provide nursing care for up to 60 people, on a short term or long term basis. The Queen Alexandra Hospital Home has three wards: Alexandra, Norfolk (North) and Norfolk (South). At the time of our visit there were 53 people living at the service and one person receiving short term care. Nine bedrooms were being shared. These rooms were spacious and offered privacy to those living in them. The service is equipped to aid rehabilitation of people back into the community, if appropriate, and to promote independence. Communal areas offered people a variety of options of where they could spend their time including if they were receiving visitors. Premises are purpose-built to meet people’s needs.

At the last inspection carried out on the 8 and 9 October 2014 the service was rated Good. At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

We carried out this inspection as part of our routine schedule of inspections and to check that people were still receiving a good standard of care and support.

People and their relatives felt that The Queen Alexandra Hospital Home provided safe care and that premises and equipment were well maintained. Staff, including the nursing team, responded to people's needs promptly and had been trained to recognise the signs of potential abuse; they knew what action to take if they had any concerns. Risks to people were identified, assessed and managed safely by staff. Staffing levels were sufficient to meet people's needs and safe recruitment practices were in place. Medicines were managed safely to ensure people received their medicines as prescribed.

People received effective care from staff that had completed extensive training in a range of areas. Registered nurses completed additional training to meet people's needs. Staff were given opportunities for them to study for additional qualifications. All staff training was up-to-date. Team meetings were held and staff had regular communication with each other at handover meetings which took place between each shift.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were supported to have sufficient amounts of food to eat and plenty to drink to maintain a healthy diet. They had access to healthcare professionals. This included access to professionals employed directly by the service such as speech and language therapists, physiotherapists and an occupational therapist. This meant people’s needs could be assessed promptly and support and treatment could be commenced without delay. People's rooms were decorated in line with their personal preferences.

Staff knew people well and positive, caring relationships had been developed. People were encouraged to express their views and these were respected by the staff that supported them.

People were involved in decisions about their care as much as they were able. Their privacy and dignity were respected and promoted. Staff understood how to care for people in a sensitive way.

Care plans provided personalised information. People's personal preferences and their likes and dislikes were documented so that staff knew how people wished to be supported. There was a variety of activities on offer which people could choose to do if they so wished.

Complaints were dealt with in line with the provider's complaints procedure.

Weekly and monthly checks were carried out to monitor the quality of the service provided. There were regular staff meetings and feedback was sought on the quality of the service provided. People and staff were able

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 13 July 2017

The service remains Good.

Effective

Good

Updated 13 July 2017

The service was effective.

A supervision and appraisal programme was in place. The registered manager took immediate action where supervisions for some staff had lapsed.

People's care needs were managed effectively by a knowledgeable staff team that were able to meet people's individual needs. A comprehensive training programme was provided and refresher courses were booked.

People's nutritional needs were monitored and they had access to home cooked food. They had access to speech and language support and to a dietician, so that all aspects of their dietary care was catered for.

People's capacity to make decisions was assessed at the point of admission and throughout their stay. Staff understood how consent to care should be considered.

People had access to health care services and to a range of healthcare professionals on site. Premises were purpose built and equipped to encourage rehabilitation and independence of people using the service.

Caring

Good

Updated 13 July 2017

The service remains Good.

Responsive

Good

Updated 13 July 2017

The service remains Good.

Well-led

Good

Updated 13 July 2017

The service remains Good.