You are here

Reports


Inspection carried out on 7 February 2020

During a routine inspection

About the service

Town View is a purpose-built care service run by the East Riding of Yorkshire Council. It is registered to provide a respite service for up to 14 people who are over 18 years old with learning and physical disabilities. Respite care provides planned short- and long-term breaks for people and their families including temporary emergency care. At the time of inspection 14 people were using the service.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People staying at Town View were happy and well supported. The home provided a safe place for people to stay and enjoy their everyday routines. Risks to people were assessed and managed appropriately to promote independence. There were suitable numbers of appropriately recruited staff. Appropriate systems were in place to manage medicines safely.

Staff were well trained and received suitable support. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. People’s diverse needs were assessed and respected.

Staff understood their roles and knew what was expected of them. Staff were kind and caring and promoted positive relationships with people within the environment. The service had a warm, friendly and welcoming atmosphere with people enjoying the way staff provided them with care and support. Relatives spoke positively about the service.

People spent time in a way they chose to. Staff understood the importance of supporting people to be socially included and prevented them from social isolation. Complaints were responded to appropriately. People were encouraged to express their feelings and were supported with bereavement.

The service was focused on people’s wellbeing and having a sense of purpose. The registered manager promoted the visions and values of the service by embedding an open and honest culture. Staff felt supported in their role and had formed good working relationships. Quality assurance systems in place, monitored the service effectively and drove improvements when they were needed.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the Care Quality Commission website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was good. (Published 12 July 2017).

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We will continue to monitor information we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If we receive any concerning information we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 6 June 2017

During a routine inspection

The inspection visit took place on 06 June 2017 and was unannounced.

Town View is a purpose built care service run by the East Riding of Yorkshire Council. It is registered to provide respite services for up to 14 people who are over 18 years old and require support with learning and physical disabilities. The service has two floors with seven bedrooms on each floor and other facilities provided mainly on the ground floor. There is also a courtyard and garden area. A total of 88 people were registered to use the service. At the time of the visit there were three people staying in the service.

At the last inspection in November 2014 the service was rated 'Good'. At this inspection we found the service remained 'Good'.

The registered manager had systems in place to record safeguarding concerns, accidents and incidents and take appropriate action when required. Recruitment checks were carried out to ensure suitable people were employed to work at the service. Our observations and discussions with staff and relatives of people who stayed at the service confirmed sufficient staff were on duty.

The registered manager understood the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). This meant they were working within the law to support people who may lack capacity to make their own decisions.

Risk assessments had been developed to minimise the potential risk of harm to people who stayed at the service. These had been kept under review and were relevant to the care and support people required.

Care plans were in place detailing how people wished to be supported. People who received support, or where appropriate their relatives, were involved in decisions and consented to their care.

People’s independence and choice was promoted.

Staff responsible for assisting people with their medicines had received training to ensure they had the competency and skills required.

We observed regular snacks and drinks were provided between meals to ensure people received adequate nutrition and hydration. Comments from people who stayed at the service were all positive about the quality of meals provided. One person said, “The food here is the best.”

We found people had access to healthcare professionals and their healthcare needs were met.

Relatives of people who used the service told us people were encouraged to participate in activities of their choice and a range of activities that had been organised.

People who used the service and their relatives knew how to raise a concern or to make a complaint. The complaints procedure was available and people said they were encouraged to raise concerns.

The registered manager used a variety of methods to assess and monitor the quality of Town View. These included external audits, regular internal audits of the service, surveys and staff and relatives meetings to seek the views of people about the quality of care being provided.

Inspection carried out on 12 November 2014

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 12 November 2014 and was unannounced.

At the last inspection the service was fully compliant with the regulations and no improvements were required.

Town View is a purpose built care service run by the East Riding of Yorkshire Council. It is registered to provide respite services for up to 14 people who are over 18 years old and require support with learning and physical disabilities. The service has two floors with seven bedrooms on each floor and other facilities provided mainly on the ground floor. There is also a courtyard and garden area. At the time of the visit there were four people staying in the service.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were supported to be kept safe and protected from harm. Staff knew how to handle any allegations of harm and had received training to help support people with this. Additionally people were supported to be able to take risks in their lives, for example when going out in the local community.

People were supported by adequate numbers of staff who had been recruited through a formal process. The process included undertaking checks to ensure potential staff were suitable to work with vulnerable people.

People were supported to have their medication needs safely met.

Observations of staff reflected they were caring and supportive with people. They were patient with people and clearly knew people’s needs.

Staff completed an induction when starting work in the service and attended a variety of training. This helped to make sure they had the necessary skills to support people effectively.

CQC monitors the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) which apply to care homes. DoLS are part of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA 2005) legislation which is in place for people who are unable to make decisions for themselves. The legislation is designed to make sure any decisions are made in the person’s best interest. One person had been supported by the service for this. Additionally the registered manager was currently undertaking a piece of work to help make sure this legislation was met.

Professional’s told us that staff were responsive and caring. They said staff communicated well with relatives and professionals.

Information about people’s diet and health was known to the service. This helped to ensure continuity of care and support. People received a choice of meals whilst staying in the service and received appropriate support with these. When necessary the service supported people to attend medical appointments.

Relatives gave positive feedback about the service. One person commented “Staff here walk on water – they are fantastic”, “They have looked after my relative in a way I would have been proud of.”

Care planning documents were in place which helped staff to make sure they were aware of the likes and dislikes of each person. The service responded well to people’s needs. Staff were aware of individual preferences. Any concerns raised were responded to and staff worked hard to support people though change.

The manager had been in post for some time and knew the service well. They had systems in place to help ensure the safe running of the service, this included consultation with people who used the service and staff.

Inspection carried out on 25 June 2013

During a routine inspection

We used a number of different methods to help us understand the experiences of people who used the service. During the day we sat with the people who used the service and observed their daily activities including the lunchtime meal. We also observed their interactions with staff. We spoke with people who used the service and with members of staff. We reviewed documentation including three care plans.

We saw that care needs were discussed with people and/or their relatives and before people received care their consent was asked for. One person said �Staff always ask me if I want to do something. I went to the shop today�.

During our visit we saw that the home looked clean and tidy and there were infection control procedures in place. It had a homely environment and people said they were content in the home. People told us they were well cared for. One person said �It�s OK here, me and my parents get a break�. Another person told us �It�s nice here, the food is OK, there�s always something I like�.

There were enough qualified, skilled and experienced staff to meet people's needs.

There was a complaints procedure in place at the home. The people we spoke with knew what to do if they had any concerns. The provider had systems in place to assess and monitor the quality of service that people received.

Inspection carried out on 27 April 2012

During a routine inspection

We spoke to three people that were accessing the service. All three people spoke positively about the staff and the service. They felt that their choices were respected and that staff were both nice and polite.