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Norwood - 30 Old Church Lane Outstanding

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Outstanding

Updated 9 May 2018

Norwood – 30 Old Church Lane (OCL) is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. Norwood – 30 OCL accommodates eight people in one adapted building, the home has currently one vacancy. There is also a self-contained flat available which can accommodate up to two people. The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any person. Norwood – 30 OCL promoted the Jewish way of life, which meant people who used the service were able to follow their religious beliefs, maintain a kosher diet and celebrate Jewish festivals.

At the last inspection on 19 November 2015, the service was rated Outstanding.

At this inspection we found the service remained Outstanding.

Norwood – 30 OCL had a manager registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC), however the registered manager had been promoted to Head of Care Services and an acting manager had been appointed to undertake day to day management of Norwood – 30 OCL. The registered manager was still present for about two days per week at Norwood – 30 OCL and the acting manager will register with the CQC in April 2018. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were safe. Staff demonstrated thorough understanding and knowledge of how to protect people who used the service from harm. The service ensured that sufficient levels of staff were deployed to make sure people’s needs were met at any time. People who used the service were listened to and consulted as to what made them anxious and supported them to take a full part in their home and in the community. Norwood – 30 OCL introduced creative ways of retaining and developing staff, which ensured consistency and meant people who used the service were supported by staff which knew them well. Risk assessments formed part of the care planning process and encouraged people to stay as independent as possible without compromising their safety. Risk assessments were reviewed regularly by involving people who used the service, their relatives and staff who supported them. Medicines were continued to be managed safely with the emphasis of reducing rather than increasing the medicines people who used the service were prescribed. This was in particular paramount in relation to medicines prescribed to manage behaviours that challenge the service.

People who used the service, relatives and befrienders spoke highly about the care provided and received at Norwood – 30 OCL. The service consistently supported people who used the service to maintain and build relationships internally and externally. Norwood – 30 OCL looked at creative ways to help people who used the service to gain new skills, become more independent and become a valued member within the community, by following their aspiration of gaining payed employment. Staff and people maintained excellent professional relationships and staff demonstrated an exceptional understanding of people’s needs, abilities and likes and dislikes. People who used the service continued to take part in national and international fundraising events with the help of staff.

Each person had a clear and detailed care plan tailored to their individual needs. The care plans highlighted specific support needs, particularly involving anxiety and how to support the p

Inspection areas

Safe

Outstanding

Updated 9 May 2018

The service remains Outstanding.

Effective

Good

Updated 9 May 2018

The service remains Good.

Caring

Outstanding

Updated 9 May 2018

The service remains Outstanding.

Responsive

Good

Updated 9 May 2018

The service remains Good.

Well-led

Outstanding

Updated 9 May 2018

The service improved to Outstanding. The registered manager promoted strong values and a person centred culture. Staff were committed to delivering person centred care and the registered manager ensured that this was consistently maintained.

There was a strong emphasis on continual improvement and best practice which benefited people and staff. There were robust systems to ensure quality and identify any potential improvements to the service. The registered manager promoted an open and inclusive culture that encouraged continual feedback.

The registered provider continuously looked for ways to improve the service by engaging people who used the service, staff and relatives to contribute and comment on the quality of service provided.