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Bromley Park Dementia Nursing Home Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 5 January 2019

This inspection took place on the 6 and 9 November 2018 and was unannounced. Bromley Park Dementia Nursing Home is a care home that specialises in care and support for people living with dementia. The home can accommodate up to 38 people in single rooms. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. At the time of our inspection there were 35 people living at the home.

The service had an experienced registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have a legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The registered manager was aware of their legal requirement to display their current CQC rating which we saw was on display within the home and on the provider’s website.

At our last inspection of the service on 24 and 25 October 2017 we rated the service overall as 'Requires Improvement'. This was because although there had been considerable improvements to the service following our inspection in April 2017 where we found concerns and took enforcement actions, further improvements were required to ensure changes made were consistently embedded at the home over time. We also found a breach of regulation 12 as some changes in risks for some people had not always been identified, monitored or guidance provided to staff.

At this inspection we found continued improvements had been made across all key questions and the breach of Regulation 12 had been met.

Risks to people were identified, assessed and managed by staff to help keep people safe and well. Medicines were managed, administered and stored safely. People were protected from the risk of abuse, because staff were aware of the types of abuse and the action to take to ensure people’s safety and well-being. There were systems in place to ensure people were protected from the risk of infection and the home environment was clean and well maintained. Accidents and incidents were recorded, monitored and acted on appropriately. There were safe staff recruitment practices in place and appropriate numbers of staff to meet people’s needs in a timely manner.

People’s needs and preferences were met by suitably skilled staff with the right knowledge and experience. There were systems in place to ensure staff were inducted into the service appropriately. Staff received training, supervision and appraisals. There were systems in place which ensured the service complied with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA 2005). This provides protection for people who do not have capacity to make decisions for themselves. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. People’s physical, mental and social needs were assessed before they moved into the home. The home environment was suitably maintained and adapted to meet people’s needs. People were supported to eat a well-balanced diet. People were supported to maintain their health and well-being.

People were supported to maintain relationships that were important to them. There were established and affectionate relationships between staff, people and their relatives. People were able to express their views, were involved in decisions about their day to day care and were provided with information about the service. People's privacy and dignity was respected and maintained.

People’s diverse needs were met and staff were committed to supporting people to meet their needs with regard to their disability, race, religion, sexual orientation and gender. People were involved in making decisi

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 5 January 2019

The service was safe

Risks to people�s health and well-being were identified, assessed, managed and reviewed on a regular basis to ensure people�s safety.

There were systems in place to safeguard people from possible harm or abuse and staff were aware of the action to take if they had any concerns.

There were systems in place for the monitoring, investigating and learning from incidents and accidents.

There were safe, robust staff recruitment practices in place and appropriate numbers of staff to meet people�s needs in a timely manner.

Medicines were stored, managed and administered safely.

There were systems in place to manage emergencies and to reduce the risk of infection.

Effective

Good

Updated 5 January 2019

The service was effective

There were processes in place to ensure staff new to the service were provided with an induction.

Staff were supported to do their job and received regular training, supervision and annual appraisals of their work performance.

There were systems in place which ensured the service complied with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA 2005). This provides protection for people who do not have capacity to make decisions for themselves.

People�s physical, mental and social needs were assessed before they moved into the home.

The home environment was suitably maintained and adapted to meet people�s needs.

People were supported to eat a well-balanced diet.

People were supported to maintain their health and well-being.

Caring

Good

Updated 5 January 2019

The service was caring

People were supported to maintain relationships that were important to them.

There were established and affectionate relationships between staff, people and their relatives.

People were able to express their views and were provided with information about the service.

People's privacy and dignity was respected and maintained.

Responsive

Good

Updated 5 January 2019

The service was responsive

People�s diverse needs were met and staff were committed to supporting people to meet their needs with regard to their disability, race, religion, sexual orientation and gender.

People were involved in making decisions about their care.

There was a range of activities available to meet people�s interests and needs.

The service provided care and support to people at the end of their lives.

People�s needs were reviewed and monitored on a regular basis.

People were provided with information on how to make a complaint.

Well-led

Good

Updated 5 January 2019

The service was well-led

There were well-led and effective systems in place to monitor the quality of the service provided.

The leadership at the home was positive and effective and had created an open and inclusive culture. Staff spoke positively about the registered manager.

Staff worked well as a team, communicated clearly and supported each other where needed.

People�s views about the service were sought and considered.

The provider worked in partnership with other agencies, charities, community initiatives and professionals to ensure people received appropriate levels of care and support to meet their needs and information and best practice was shared between agencies when appropriate.