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Inspection carried out on 31 August 2017

During a routine inspection

OSJCT Southfield House is registered to provide accommodation and care for 32 older people and/or people who live with dementia. There were 29 people living in the service at the time of our inspection.

The service was run by a company that was the registered provider. At this inspection the company was represented by two of their area operations managers. There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated regulations about how the service is run. In this report when we speak about both the company (as represented by the area operations managers) and the registered manager we refer to them as being, ‘the registered persons’.

At the last inspection on 28 May 2015 the service was rated Good.

At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

This inspection was unannounced and was carried out on 31 August 2017.

Care staff knew how to keep people safe from the risk of abuse including financial mistreatment. People had been helped to avoid preventable accidents and medicines were safely managed. There were enough care staff on duty and background checks had been completed before new care staff had been appointed.

Although some care staff had not received all of the training the registered persons said they needed, in practice they knew how to care for people in the right way. People enjoyed their meals and were helped to eat and drink enough. They had also been supported to obtain all of the healthcare assistance they needed.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and care staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. Policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were treated with compassion, respect and courtesy. Care staff recognised people’s right to privacy and promoted their dignity. Confidential information was kept private.

People had been consulted about the care they wanted to receive and had been given all of the assistance they needed. As part of this care staff had promoted positive outcomes for people who lived with dementia. In addition, people had been supported to pursue their hobbies and interests. There was a system for quickly and fairly resolving complaints.

People had been consulted about the development of their home and quality checks had been completed to ensure that people received safe care. Care staff were supported to speak out if they had any concerns and good team work was promoted.

Further information is in the detailed findings below.

Inspection carried out on 28 May 2015

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced inspection carried out on 28 May 2015. OSJCT Southfield House provides accommodation for up to 32 people who require residential or nursing care and also supports people living with dementia. There were 28 people living in the service when we carried out our inspection.

At the time of our inspection the service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The Care Quality Commission is required by law to monitor how a provider applies the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) and to report on what we find. DoLS are in place to protect people where they do not have capacity to make decisions and where it is considered necessary to restrict their freedom in some way. This is usually to protect themselves. At the time of our inspection no one was currently subject to an active DoLS authorisation.

Staff knew how to recognise and report any concerns so that people were kept safe from harm and background checks had been completed before new staff were appointed. Staff helped people to avoid having accidents. There were arrangements in place for ordering, storing, administering and disposing of medicines.

Staff had been supported to assist people in the right way, including people who lived with dementia and who could become distressed. People had been helped to eat and drink enough to stay well. We found that people were provided with a choice of meals. When necessary, people were given extra help to make sure that they had enough to eat and drink. People had access to a range of healthcare professionals when they required specialist help.

Staff understood people’s needs, wishes and preferences and they had been trained to provide effective and safe care which met people’s individual needs. People were treated with kindness, compassion and respect.

People were able to see their friends and families when they wanted. There were no restrictions on when people could visit the service. Visitors were made welcome by the staff in the service. People and their relatives had been consulted about the care they wanted to be provided. Staff knew the people they supported and the choices they made about their care and people were supported to pursue their hobbies and interests.

There were systems in place for handling and resolving complaints. People and their relatives knew how to raise a concern. The service was run in an open and inclusive way that encouraged staff to speak out if they had any concerns. The registered manager and the registered provider regularly assessed and monitored the quality of the service provided for people. The service had established links with local community groups which benefited people who lived in the service.

Inspection carried out on 16 January 2014

During a routine inspection

We observed lunchtime. We saw care staff asked people what they wanted to eat. People were given of choice of where to sit and many people sat in friendship groups.

We looked at the care files for four people. We saw their care files were person centred. Risk assessments such as falls, moving and handling and nutrition had been undertaken and care was planned in accordance with the outcomes.

We walked about the home and saw all areas were clean and furniture and equipment was in a good state of repair. The manager told us there was a refurbishment programme in place.

People and their families told us they thought staff had the knowledge and skills for their role. One relative told us, “Staff are just so kind and caring, they know them all as individuals.”

We asked people if they knew how to complain if they were unhappy with any aspect of life in the home. One person said, “. There is no need to complain, I’m very happy here.”

Inspection carried out on 17 October 2012

During a routine inspection

As part of our inspection we spoke with a number of people who lived at Southfield House. They spoke positively about the care and support they received. They told us they liked living in there and staff supported them to make choices and decisions about the care and treatment. We also spoke with visiting relatives and members of staff.

People said staff always asked them what the wanted to do or what they wanted to eat or drink. One person said, “I value my independence and staff support me to do the little things for myself.” Another person said, “The food is quite nice here and they always ask you what you want.”

People told us they were involved in decisions about the home and attended residents meetings. One person said, “It’s good to be involved. I ask lots of different things. Perhaps I talk too much, but the manger listens.”

They told us they felt valued and staff listened to them. We asked them if they knew how to complain if they were not happy. One person said, “I would speak to the manager or the lady that brings the tablets.”

Inspection carried out on 5 July 2011

During a routine inspection

When we visited the home we saw staff speaking to people in a respectful manner and being treated as individuals. Staff were giving people choices of where they wanted to sit, what they wanted to wear and do that day.

People told us they liked living at the service. They were happy with the treatment that had been provided. People said they could stay in their rooms if they wished.

They told us they were treated with dignity and respect and felt safe and comfortable to move around the home freely. People also said the home was clean at all times.

People said that the service encouraged volunteers from the local community to help out with serving drinks, giving biscuits and help with different projects, for example painting the summer house.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)