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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Outstanding

Updated 16 February 2018

Alina Homecare was registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in February 2014 as a domiciliary care agency. It provides personal care to a range of older adults and younger adults living in their own houses and flats in the community. These included people living with dementia, a mental health illness, a physical disability, a learning disability, people with substance misuse, sensory impairment or an eating disorder. The service was also registered to provide care for children from 0-18 years; although at the time of inspection no children were receiving a service.

At the last inspection in March 2015, the service was rated as good in all five areas. The overall rating was good.

At this inspection, we found the service had improved and was now outstanding in two areas and good in three areas. The overall rating had improved to outstanding.

This comprehensive inspection took place on 2 November 2017 and was unannounced.

There were 130 people receiving a service from the agency. Although the majority of people using the agency received a regulated activity, some received support visits only. CQC only inspects the service being received by people provided with ‘personal care’; help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also take into account any wider social care provided. The time of visits ranged from 15 minutes to one and quarter hours, with the frequency of visits from once a week to four times a day. There were 17 people who required two care workers at each visit to support them. There were 65 full and part-time staff employed.

There was registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The care people received was outstanding. Care workers treated people with respect, dignity and compassion. They were motivated, passionate and proud of their jobs. People said care workers went ‘the extra mile’ and the agency put people at the heart of their service. They went above and beyond what was expected of them when they needed to. There were many examples of when this happened and how the agency had dealt with emergency and unusual situations in a professional, exceptionally kind and responsive way.

People were at the heart of the service. Care workers knew what mattered to people the most. They recognised how important it was for families and friends to be involved in people’s care, support and wellbeing. Two people commented, “All the staff are good … I can’t speak more highly of them … they are very caring” and I have nothing but praise for them … they are so kind and polite to me … they are lovely girls, nothing is too much trouble for them.” Care workers recognised the importance of pets in people’s lives and regularly cared and looked after them as part of the family.

People were encouraged to be as independent as possible by care workers they trusted and felt safe with. They were supported to lead as good a quality of life as possible. People were never rushed and care workers took the time to support them in the right way. People commented, “I never feel rushed … they always make sure I’ve got everything I need before they go. They are more like friends, it’s as if we’ve known each other for years … they’d do anything for me” and “They’re lovely girls … I’m lucky to have them.”

Care workers treated people equally, irrespective of their beliefs, opinions or preferences. Meaningful relationships had been developed between people, their relatives and staff. People felt comfortable and trusted the care workers who came into their home. Caring for people’s wellbeing was an important part of the agencies philosophy. People had a regular team of care workers and felt they had become part

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 16 February 2018

The service remains safe.

Effective

Good

Updated 16 February 2018

The service remains effective.

Caring

Outstanding

Updated 16 February 2018

The service has improved to outstanding.

People were cared for by staff who provided kind, compassionate and respectful care. They treated people as individuals and involved people and their families in their planned personalised care.

Staff also took into account people’s wellbeing and what was important to them. They enhanced people’s quality of life as much as possible.

Staff went the ‘extra mile’ to support people and showed an outstanding kind and caring approach to people.

Responsive

Good

Updated 16 February 2018

The service remains good.

Well-led

Outstanding

Updated 16 February 2018

The service has improved to outstanding.

The leadership and management of the service was outstanding. There was a well organised management team who had clear roles and responsibilities. The registered manager acted as a role model for staff.

Care workers were motivated, passionate and proud of their jobs. They spoke positively about the management team and that they felt involved in the running of the service. Award ceremonies were held to recognise and celebrate good care from staff members.

The management team promoted strong values and a person centred approach. There was an open culture where ‘lessons learnt’ were encouraged.

People, families and care workers suggestions and feedback were welcomed and taken into account to improve the service.

There were robust systems to assure quality and identify any potential improvements to the service. This meant people benefited from a constantly improving service that they were at the heart of.

The service played an important part in the community and fostered links with other organisations to benefit people.