You are here

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 7 April 2017

The Hillings is registered to provide accommodation and personal care for up to 72 people. There were 66 older people living in the service at the time of the inspection.

This unannounced inspection took place on 6 March 2017.

There was a registered manager in post at the time of this inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Risk assessments did not always provide sufficiently detailed information for staff about how to manage risks to people. Where quality monitoring systems had identified that improvements were required, action plans were in place to monitor the improvements.

Accidents and incidents were reviewed to reduce the risk of any reoccurrence.

People received their medicines as prescribed and medicines were stored and disposed of in a safe way. Staff who administered medicines had received appropriate training.

The provider had a recruitment process in place and staff were only employed within the service after all essential safety checks had been satisfactorily completed. Staff were knowledgeable about reporting any incidents of harm. People were looked after by enough staff to support them with their individual needs.

People were provided with a choice of meals. When necessary, people were given any extra help they needed to make sure that they had enough to eat and drink to keep them healthy.

Staff referred people appropriately to healthcare professionals.

The service was acting in accordance with the requirements of the MCA including the DoLS. The registered manager was able to demonstrate how they supported people to make decisions about their care. Where people were unable to do so, there were records showing that decisions were being taken in their best interests. DoLS applications had been submitted to the appropriate authority. This meant that people did not have restrictions placed on them without the correct procedures being followed.

Staff knew how to meet people’s current needs. Staff were trained, supported and supervised to do their job. Staff treated people with dignity and respect.

People were encouraged to maintain hobbies and interests and join in the activities provided at the service and in the community.

People’s views were listened to and acted on. People received care and support in the way they preferred.

Quality assurance procedures were in place and these were effective in identifying areas for improvements.

Inspection areas

Safe

Requires improvement

Updated 7 April 2017

The service was not always safe.

Whilst risks to people had been identified, full details risks and how to minimise them were not always recorded or known by staff.

People were supported to take their prescribed medicines.

There were sufficient numbers of staff with the appropriate skills to keep people safe and meet their assessed needs.

Staff were only employed after all the essential pre-employment checks had been satisfactorily completed.

Effective

Good

Updated 7 April 2017

The service was effective.

When appropriate people were assessed for their capacity to make day-to-day decisions. Appropriate DoLS applications were being made to the authorising agencies to ensure that people were only deprived of their liberty in a lawful way.

Staff were trained to support people with their care needs. Staff had regular supervisions to ensure that they carried out effective care and support.

People’s health and nutritional needs were met.

Caring

Good

Updated 7 April 2017

The service was caring.

Staff treated people with respect and were knowledgeable about people’s needs and preferences.

People could choose how and where they spent their time.

Responsive

Good

Updated 7 April 2017

The service was responsive.

Whilst care plans did not always contain up to date information about the support that people needed; staff were aware of people’s needs.

People were encouraged to maintain hobbies and interests and join in the activities provided at the service and in the community.

People’s views were listened to and acted on. People received care and support in the way they preferred.

Well-led

Good

Updated 7 April 2017

The service was well-led

Systems were in place to monitor the quality of the service provided and where required action plans were in place to bring about improvement.

There were opportunities for people and staff to express their views about the service.