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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 9 January 2018

Firbank Residential Care Home is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. The home is registered to provide accommodation for 26 people. There were 21 people living at the home at the time of the inspection.

The home was based on three floors, connected by a passenger lift and stairwells. Two bedrooms had en-suite facilities and there were toilets and bathrooms available on each floor. There was a choice of communal spaces comprising of two communal lounges and one dining room where people were able to socialise.

The inspection was conducted on 13 and 17 November 2017 and was unannounced. There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At our last inspection, on 18 and 22 August 2016, we identified breaches of Regulations 12, 13 and 17 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. The provider had failed to maintain a clean, hygienic environment; had failed to manage individual risks to people effectively; had failed to protect people from the risk of being deprived of their liberty without lawful authority; and had failed to operate effective quality assurance systems.

The provider wrote to us, detailing the action they would take to address the concerns. At this inspection, we found action had been taken to address all areas of concern and there were no longer any breaches of the regulations.

People felt safe living at the home. Staff knew how to identify, prevent and report abuse. They assessed and managed risks to people and risks posed by the environment effectively.

Arrangements were in place for the safe management of medicines. People received their medicines as prescribed. The home was clean and hygienic and staff followed best practice guidance to control the risk and spread of infection.

There were enough staff to meet people’s needs in a timely way. Appropriate recruitment procedures were in place and pre-employment checks were completed before staff started working with people.

People’s needs were met by staff who were competent, trained and supported in their role. Staff acted in the best interests of people and followed legislation designed to protect people’s rights and freedom.

People’s dietary needs were met and they received appropriate support to eat and drink enough. Adaptations had been made to the home to make it supportive of people living with dementia.

People were supported to access healthcare services when needed. Staff made information available to other healthcare providers to help ensure continuity of care.

People were cared for with kindness and compassion. Staff knew people well and supported people to maintain relationships that were important to them.

Staff protected people’s privacy and dignity. They encouraged people to remain as independent as possible and involved them in planning the care and support they received.

People’s needs were met in a personalised way. Each person had a care plan that was centred on their needs and reviewed regularly. Staff empowered people to make choices and responded promptly when people’s needs changed.

People had access to a meaningful activities based on their individual interests, including regular access to the community. They knew how to make a complaint and a complaints procedure was in place.

Staff took account of people’s end of life wishes and preferences. They supported people to remain comfortable and pain free.

People and their relatives felt the service was run well. Staff we

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 9 January 2018

The service was safe.

People felt safe and staff had received training in safeguarding adults. Individual risks to people were managed effectively.

There were appropriate systems in place to protect people by the prevention and control of infection.

There were enough staff to meet people’s needs and recruitment practices helped ensure only suitable staff were employed.

Arrangements were in place for the safe management of medicines and people received their medicines as prescribed.

Effective

Good

Updated 9 January 2018

The service was effective.

Staff acted in the best interests of people and followed legislation designed to protect people’s rights and freedom.

Adaptations had been made to the environment to make it supportive of people who lived at Firbank.

People received effective care from staff who were competent, suitably trained and supported in their roles.

People praised the quality of the meals and were supported to eat and drink enough.

People had access to health professionals and specialists when needed. When people were transferred to hospital, staff ensured key information accompanied them to help ensure their received ongoing healthcare support.

Caring

Good

Updated 9 January 2018

The service was caring.

Staff treated people with kindness and compassion. They interacted positively with people and promoted their independence.

Staff supported people to maintain relationships that were important to them.

Staff protected people’s privacy and respected their dignity.

People, and family members where appropriate, were involved in planning the care and support they received.

Responsive

Good

Updated 9 January 2018

The service was responsive.

Care and support were centred on the individual needs of each person. Care plans were reviewed regularly and staff responded promptly when people’s needs changed.

People were empowered to make choices about all aspects of their lives. They had access to a range of meaningful activities suited to their individual interests.

Staff had the necessary training and commitment to support people to receive end of life care that helped ensure their comfort and their dignity.

People knew how to raise a complaint and there was an appropriate complaints procedure in place.

Well-led

Good

Updated 9 January 2018

The service was well-led.

People were happy living at the home and had confidence in the management.

People, their families and staff felt engaged in the way the service was run and were consulted regularly.

Staff were organised, motivated and worked well as a team. They felt supported and valued by their managers.

A quality assurance process was in place to assess and monitor the service.

People described an open culture. Visitors were welcomed at any time and links had been developed with the community to the benefit of people.