You are here

Reports


Inspection carried out on 20 November 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Trinity House is a residential care home providing personal care to seven people with a learning disability and/or autism at the time of the inspection. The service can support up to seven people.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

People’s quality of life had improved significantly due to the exceptionally responsive and person-centred support they received. Proactive support strategies had resulted in a significant reduction in the number of incidents that could be distressing for people. Staff had an excellent understanding of people's needs and how they preferred and needed to be supported.

Relatives told us they felt Trinity House was outstanding in terms of exceeding their expectations in how staff met people’s specific needs. Staff did not view the complex needs of the people who used the service as a barrier to them participating in similar activities to those of their peers.

People appeared happy and relaxed with the staff who supported them. Relatives told us people were safe and our observations confirmed this. Staff understood the importance of safeguarding and were able to tell us what they would do if they had concerns about a person's wellbeing. Staff were recruited safely and people living at the service took part in the interview process. There were enough staff to meet people’s needs. Medicines were managed safely. There was a positive approach to safety and risk which was not restrictive for people.

People were looked after by staff who had the skills and knowledge to carry out their roles. Staff communicated effectively with relevant professionals to ensure people received the healthcare support they required. Staff supported people to buy, prepare and cook food. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People were treated with dignity and respect and their independence was promoted. Relatives said staff were very kind and caring. There was a happy family atmosphere at the home. People and staff cared about each other and enjoyed spending time together. Staff understood the importance of understanding people's abilities and working with them to achieve positive outcomes.

There was a positive culture and ethos at the service which was driven by the management team. The registered manager led by example and actively promoted positive support strategies which improved people’s quality of life. Relatives felt the service was well managed and spoke positively about the changes the registered manager had made. There were effective systems in place to monitor the quality of the service. Action was taken if any issues or concerns were identified.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

For more details, please see the full report which is on the CQC website at www.cqc.org.uk

Rating at last inspection

The last rating for this service was good (published 7 April 2017).

Why we inspected

This was a planned inspection based on the previous rating.

Follow up

We

Inspection carried out on 30 March 2017

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 30 March and 5 April 2017 and was unannounced. This meant the staff and registered provider did not know we would be visiting.

Trinity House provides care and accommodation for up to seven people with a learning disability. On the day of our inspection there were seven people using the service.

The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We last inspected the service in February 2015 and rated the service as ‘Good.’ At this inspection we found the service remained ‘Good’ and met all the fundamental standards we inspected against.

Accidents and incidents were appropriately recorded and risk assessments were in place. The registered manager understood their responsibilities with regard to safeguarding and staff had been trained in safeguarding vulnerable adults.

Appropriate arrangements were in place for the administration and storage of medicines.

The home was clean, spacious and suitable for the people who used the service and appropriate health and safety checks had been carried out.

There were sufficient numbers of staff on duty in order to meet the needs of people who used the service. The registered provider had an effective recruitment and selection procedure in place and carried out relevant checks when they employed staff.

Staff were suitably trained and received regular supervisions and appraisals.

The registered provider was working within the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and was following the requirements in the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

People were protected from the risk of poor nutrition and staff were aware of people’s nutritional needs. Care records contained evidence of visits to and from external health care specialists.

People who used the service and family members were complimentary about the standard of care at Trinity House.

Staff treated people with dignity and respect and helped to maintain people’s independence by encouraging them to care for themselves where possible.

Care records showed that people’s needs were assessed before they started using the service and care plans were written in a person-centred way. Person-centred is about ensuring the person is at the centre of any care or support plans and their individual wishes, needs and choices are taken into account.

Activities were arranged for people who used the service based on their likes and interests and to help meet their social needs.

The registered provider had an effective complaints procedure in place and people who used the service and family members were aware of how to make a complaint.

The service had good links with the local community and local organisations.

Staff felt supported by the management team and were comfortable raising any concerns. People who used the service, family members and staff were regularly consulted about the quality of the service.

Inspection carried out on 24 and 25 February 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 24 and 25 February 2015 and was unannounced. This meant the staff and provider did not know we would be visiting.

Trinity House provides care and accommodation for up to seven people. On the day of our inspection there were seven people using the service.

The home had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Trinity House was last inspected by CQC on 16 October 2013 and was compliant.

There were sufficient numbers of staff on duty in order to meet the needs of people using the service. The provider had an effective recruitment and selection procedure in place and carried out relevant checks when they employed staff.

Incidents and accidents were appropriately recorded and included details of any follow up action.

Medicines were administered safely and there was an effective medicines ordering system in place.

Staff training was up to date and a new system of delegation had been introduced to ensure staff received regular supervisions and appraisals.

The home was clean, spacious and suitable for the people who used the service.

CQC monitors the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) which applies to care homes. The Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) are part of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. They aim to make sure that people in care homes, hospitals and supported living are looked after in a way that does not inappropriately restrict their freedom. We discussed DoLS with the registered manager and looked at records. We found the provider was following the requirements in the DoLS.

People who used the service, and family members, were complimentary about the standard of care at Trinity House.

Staff treated people with dignity and respect and helped to maintain people’s independence by encouraging them to care for themselves where possible.

We saw that the home had a full programme of activities in place for people who used the service.

The provider had a complaints policy and procedure in place and complaints were fully investigated.

The provider had a robust quality assurance system in place and gathered information about the quality of their service from a variety of sources.

Inspection carried out on 16 October 2013

During a routine inspection

People were given all the information they needed to make an informed decision about their care and were asked to provide their consent to such care.

We saw people were cared for effectively and care was planned for the individual.

We saw the premises were safe and suitable.

Staff were supported to deliver care and treatment safely and to an appropriate standard.

We saw records were accurate and appropriately maintained.

People who used the service and their families were very positive about the care and support provided. Comments included “Trinity House is brilliant. They take X everywhere. The care is very good” and “The staff are great, they really understand autism and support X very well”.

Inspection carried out on 7 December 2012

During a routine inspection

People took part in a range of community-based activities and outings. One person told us “I have a trip planned to Manchester.”

We found members of staff were very attentive to people's needs. People looked well cared for and at ease with the staff members who were supporting them.

People’s needs were assessed and care and treatment was planned and delivered in line with their individual care plan.

People who used the service were protected from the risk of abuse, because the provider had taken reasonable steps to identify the possibility of abuse and prevent abuse from happening.

Inspection carried out on 4 March 2011

During a routine inspection

People who used the service told us that staff were good, supported them well and that they liked living in the home.

One person said, "The staff here are good, they help me when I need it , but let me make my own decisions as far as I am able".

Another person said, "I like living here, we go to the theatre and football matches".

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)