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RNID Action on Hearing Loss Fosse Bank House Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 6 December 2017

During a routine inspection

This announced inspection took place on 6 and 7 December 2017. We had previously carried out an inspection in May 2015 at which the service was rated Good. Since the last inspection, two additional flats had been built on the site, both of which were fully wheelchair accessible.

RNID Action on Hearing Loss Fosse Bank House (referred to as Fosse Bank House throughout the report) is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

Fosse Bank House provides personal care and accommodation for up to eight people aged between 18-65 who are deaf or have significant hearing loss and additional support needs. Accommodation is provided in individual self-contained flats with on-site staff support. Communal areas are also available to promote socialisation. At the time of our inspection there were seven people using the service.

The provider had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We found the service was extremely responsive to people’s needs. The registered manager was creative in the approaches they used to ensure people were involved in decisions about their placement at Fosse Bank House. They had also taken immediate action, outside of normal working hours, to ensure a person admitted to the home had the necessary equipment in place so that staff were able to provide them with safe care which protected their dignity.

Staff were aware of equality and diversity issues in relation to the people they supported. Action was taken to help ensure people did not experience barriers when accessing the community. People were supported to access a range of activities; these activities provided people with opportunities to develop their skills, as well as promoting their well-being, independence and social inclusion. People told us staff supported them to maintain contact with their friends and family. The provider gave each individual funding to help ensure they were able to take holidays or excursions in the UK or abroad; this helped to prevent social isolation and enabled people to experience different cultures.

People were supported by staff who were caring and compassionate. Staff had a good understanding of the communication needs of the people they supported. Staff used British Sign Language (BSL) to communicate with people and all information was produced in formats people were easily able to access, including Easy Read, pictorial, BSL and DVD.

People were treated with the utmost respect at all times. Staff protected their privacy, involved them in decisions about their support needs and promoted their independence.

There were enough staff deployed to meet people’s needs. People who used the service were involved in the recruitment and selection of staff; this helped to ensure only suitable staff were employed. Staff knew the correct action to take to protect people from the risk of abuse and avoidable harm. Staff supported people to receive their medicines safely. All the people we spoke with told us they felt safe in Fosse Bank House

Detailed risk assessments were in place in relation to each individual’s care and health needs as well as any environmental risks; these helped to protect the health and welfare of people who used the service and staff. People were provided with a range of equipment to help ensure their safety and independence; these included flashing lights and doorbells as well as vibrating pillows to alert people to an emergency in the service.

People were cared for in a safe and clean enviro

Inspection carried out on 21 May 2015

During a routine inspection

This was an unannounced inspection which took place on 21 May 2015. We had previously carried out an inspection in July 2013 when we found the service to be meeting all the regulations we reviewed.

RNID Action on Hearing Loss Fosse Bank House is registered to provide personal care and accommodation for up to six people aged between 18-65 who are deaf or have significant hearing loss and additional support needs. Accommodation is provided in individual bedsits with on-site staff support. Communal areas are also available to promote socialisation. At the time of our inspection there were six people using the service.

The provider had a registered manager in place as required by the conditions of their registration with the Care Quality Commission (CQC). A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People who used the service told us they felt safe with staff who supported them. They told us staff were always available to support them in the activities they wished to do. People were enabled to make their own decisions and staff supported people to take risks to promote their independence.

Recruitment processes were robust and should help protect people who used the service from the risk of staff who were unsuitable to work with vulnerable adults. People who used the service were involved in the recruitment of staff who would be supporting them.

Staff had received training in the safe administration of medicines. The competence of staff to administer medicines safely was regularly assessed.

Staff told us they received the training and support they needed to carry out their role effectively. There were systems in place to track the training staff had completed and to plan the training required. All the staff we spoke with told us they enjoyed working in the service and felt valued by the registered manager. Staff felt able to raise any issues of concern in supervision or in staff meetings.

Staff we spoke with had a good understanding of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS); these are designed to protect the rights of individuals to make their own decisions wherever possible. Systems were in place to record where staff might need to make decisions for people in their best interests.

People who used the service had health action plans in place. Records we reviewed showed that, where necessary, people were provided with support from staff or independent interpreters to attend health appointments. People were also encouraged to discuss general health issues with staff to promote good physical and mental health. People were also supported by staff to maintain a healthy diet as much as possible.

We noted positive interactions between staff and people who used the service. People told us the staff who supported them were kind and caring and enabled them to develop their independence as much as possible. Staff demonstrated a commitment to providing care which would improve the quality of life of the people they were supporting.

Care records we looked at showed people who used the service had been involved in developing and reviewing their care and support plans. Support plans included good information about the way people wanted their support to be provided, their goals for the future and the achievements they had reached.

All the people we spoke with told us they felt able to raise any concerns with the registered manager and were confident they would be listened to. We noted systems were in place to encourage people who used the service to provide feedback on the care and support they received.

The service was based on a set of values which were clearly understood and implemented by staff. Quality assurance systems in place were used to drive forward improvements in the service.

Inspection carried out on 31 July 2013

During a routine inspection

The two people who we spoke with said they were very happy at this care home.

Two people who used the service told us, "I give my consent to all things like the rules of the home, my care plan and activities. I am happy with everything here" and "I can make my own choices. Staff will help me to go somewhere or do something but I decide. I have agreed to this". People who used the service gave their consent to care and treatment.

On the day of the inspection people who used the service were out pursuing their interests and hobbies. Two people we spoke with also told us they were encouraged to go out, either independently or with support. People were able to go on holiday. Activities and hobbies gave people an active lifestyle.

Plans of care had been developed with people who used the service and kept up to date to ensure the care given was effective.

People told us they were encouraged to be as independent as possible and set goals to improve their lifestyles.

Inspection carried out on 6 November 2012

During a routine inspection

Three people who lived at the care home told us they were happy and lived independent lifestyles supported by staff.

We found that plans of care were individually developed to meet the needs of people who used the service.

Two people who used the service said they, "Had choices" in what they did. On the day of the inspection one person had gone for a family visit and two people had gone out with staff. We found that people were able to follow their interests and social aspirations to live fulfilling lives.

Staff members we spoke with told us, "I feel well supported and trained. I think we have a good staff team and support each other" and "I am enjoying working here although quite new to the job. I feel really comfortable and I am involved in all I can be. I feel included not pushed aside". Staff felt supported and sufficiently well trained to provide competent support to people who used the service.

Inspection carried out on 21 June 2011

During a routine inspection

People said they had choices and were treated with privacy and dignity. They were able to consent to the care they received and were involved in their care and welfare. People had their nutritional needs met at the care service. They had access to health care and other relevant professionals. People felt they were safe from abuse and could raise a concern if they wished. People felt the home was clean, well equipped and maintained to provide a homely atmosphere. Staff were appreciated and there were sufficient numbers to meet the needs of people who used the service. The quality assurance systems allowed people who used the service to have some input into the way the care service was run.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)