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Kingsway Clayton House Residential Care Home Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 20 November 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service

Kingsway Clayton House is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. It provides accommodation for people living with a learning disability.

The service has been developed and designed in line with the principles and values that underpin Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. This ensures that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes. The principles reflect the need for people with learning disabilities and/or autism to live meaningful lives that include control, choice, and independence. People using the service receive planned and co-ordinated person-centred support that is appropriate and inclusive for them.

The service was a large home, bigger than most domestic style properties. It was registered for the support of up to 16 people. Eleven people were using the service. This is larger than current best practice guidance. However. the size of the service having a negative impact on people was mitigated by the building design fitting into the residential area and the other large domestic homes of a similar size. There were deliberately no identifying signs, intercom, cameras, industrial bins or anything else outside to indicate it was a care home. Staff were also discouraged from wearing anything that suggested they were care staff when coming and going with people.

People’s experience of using this service and what we found

There was a process in place to carry out quality checks. These were carried out on a regular basis. The home was clean, and staff understood how to prevent and manage infections.

There was enough staff to support people. Appropriate employment checks had been carried out to ensure staff were suitable to work with vulnerable people. Arrangements were in place to safeguard people against harm. People said they felt safe.

People enjoyed the meals and their dietary needs were catered for. This information was detailed in people’s care plans. Staff followed guidance provided to manage people's nutrition and pressure care. People were supported by staff who had received training to ensure their needs could be met. Staff received regular supervision to support their role.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible and in their best interests; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People had good health care support from external professionals. When people were unwell, staff had raised the concern and acted with health professionals to address their health care needs. People did had access to a range of activities and leisure pursuits.

We saw evidence of caring relationships between staff and people who lived at the home. Staff were aware of people's life history and preferences and used this information to develop relationships. People felt well cared for by staff. Care records were personalised and were regularly reviewed.

The provider had displayed the latest CQC rating at the home and on their website. When required notifications had been completed to inform us of events and incidents.

The service applied the principles and values of Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These ensure that people who use the service can live as full a life as possible and achieve the best possible outcomes that include control, choice and independence.

The outcomes for people using the service reflected the principles and values of Registering the Right Support by promoting choice and control, independence and inclusion. People's support focused on them having as many opportunities as possible for them to gain new skills and become more independent.

More information

Inspection carried out on 5 April 2017

During a routine inspection

Kingsway Clayton is a residential care home for people living with a learning disability. They are registered to provide care for up to 16 people. At the time of our inspection there were 13 people living at the home.

At the last inspection, the service was rated Good. At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated regulations.

On the day of our inspection staff interacted well with people. People and their relatives told us that they felt safe and well cared for. Staff knew how to keep people safe. The provider had systems and processes in place to keep people safe.

Medicines were administered and managed safely.

We found that people’s health care needs were assessed and care planned and delivered to meet those needs. People had access to healthcare professionals such as the district nurse and GP and also specialist professionals. People had their nutritional needs assessed and were supported with their meals to keep them healthy.

There were sufficient staff to meet people’s needs and staff responded in a timely and appropriate manner to people. Staff were provided with training on a variety of subjects to ensure that they had the skills to meet people’s needs. The provider had a training plan in place and staff had received supervision.

People were encouraged to enjoy a range of leisure and social activities. They were supported to maintain relationships that were important to them.

Staff felt able to raise concerns and issues with management. Relatives were aware of the process for raising concerns and were confident that they would be listened to. Regular audits were carried out and action plans put in place to address any issues which were identified. Arrangements were in place to use best practice guidance to improve the care to people.

Accidents and incidents were recorded and investigated. The provider had informed us of notifications. Notifications are events which have happened in the service that the provider is required to tell us about.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. The policies and systems in the service support this practice.

Further information is in the detailed findings below

Inspection carried out on 27 April 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 27 April 2015 and was unannounced.

Kingsway Clayton specialises in the care of people who have a learning disability. It provides accommodation for up to 16 people who require personal and nursing care. On the day of our inspection there were 13 people living at the home on a permanent basis and one person who was there for a period of assessment.

At the time of our inspection there was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are registered persons. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We found that staff interacted well with people and people were cared for safely. The provider had systems and processes in place to safeguard people and staff knew how to keep people safe.

The provider acted in accordance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).If the location is a care home Care Quality Commission is required by law to monitor the operation of the DoLS, and to report on what we find.

We found that people’s health care needs were assessed, and care planned and delivered

to meet those needs. People had access to other healthcare professionals such as a chiropodist and GP.

Staff were kind and sensitive to people when they were providing support. Staff had a good understanding of people’s needs. People had access to leisure activities and excursions to local facilities.

People had their privacy and dignity considered. Staff were aware of people’s need for privacy and dignity however they did not always respect this.

People were supported to eat enough to keep them healthy. People had access to drinks during the day and had choices at mealtimes. Where people had special dietary requirements we saw that these were provided for.

Staff were provided with training on a variety of subjects to ensure that they had the skills to meet people’s needs.

We saw that people were involved in making decisions about their care and how their day was managed.

Staff felt able to raise concerns and issues with management. We found relatives were clear about the process for raising concerns and were confident that they would be listened to. People were encouraged to raise issues both formally and informally.

Audits were carried out on a regular basis and action put in place to address any concerns and issues.

Inspection carried out on 5 February 2014

During a routine inspection

Prior to our inspection we reviewed all the information we had received from the provider. We spoke with several people who used the service to establish their views on the quality of service provision. We also spoke with the assistant manager and three carers. We also looked at some of the records held in the service including the support files. We observed the support people who used the service received from staff.

We found the people were provided with a choice of suitable and nutritious food and drink in sufficient quantities to meet their individual needs and preferences. Comments included, �The food is very nice,� and, �I like the food especially the Sunday roasts.�

People told us they thought the support staff had the right skills and knowledge to provide care in a safe and competent manner. One person told us, �I feel safe here the staff are very nice to me.�

We found that people were provided with the opportunity to comment on the quality of service provision and make suggestions for improvements. People also told us they felt confident that any concerns or complaints would be addressed by the management team to their satisfaction.

Inspection carried out on 23 January 2013

During a routine inspection

During our visit we spoke with four people who lived at the home, two relatives who visited the service, a visiting social worker, four staff members, the assistant manager and the registered manager of the home.

We looked at records. These included care records and information about how the service operated. We also spent some time in communal areas of the home. We spoke with people and observed how staff interacted with, and supported them to do what they wanted to.

We observed staff provided positive support and engaged with people who lived at the home. People appeared relaxed and comfortable in the presence of their support staff. In discussion with staff, it was evident staff understood the needs of people they supported. One person said, �I like the staff, they look after me well.� Another person said, "They always help us to do the things we like and make sure we are healthy."

A visiting relative told us, "As long as xxx is happy we are happy. We are here for a review, the staff are easy to talk to and as a family we are very happy with the care that xxx receives."

We found staff had time to support people to undertake a range of activities, trips and holidays. One person told us, "We go on holiday at least once a year.� Other comments we received ranged from, �I work in a shop every Wednesday and Friday and I love it� and �We are going on a health walk today" to �I am a member of the local theatre club in Gainsborough, I really feel I enjoy going.�

Inspection carried out on 7 February 2012

During a routine inspection

The people we spoke with told us that the home was a nice place to live.

People told us they felt safe and two people talked to us about the direct care and support they received with one person saying, �They always look after us and the things we need.�

People told us there were a lot of things to do both inside the home and in the local community. They also described previous outings and holidays that people had been on. One person told us, �We are going on holiday to Scotland soon and we are looking forward to it.�

We saw that people liked the food at the home and that they were given a choice about what they would like for each meal. One person told us, �We make some of our own food. This week I have been making lasagne for everyone and shepherds pie is my favourite meal.�

People and staff told us they were asked for their views about the running of the home by the manager and that they felt confident taking any suggestions or concerns to the manager or any of the staff team. One person said, �I can talk to them about any worries. I feel like they are all part of my family.�

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)