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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 21 February 2019

This unannounced inspection took place on 9 January 2019.

At our last comprehensive inspection of Dunheved Lodge in July 2016 we rated the service ‘Good’ overall. At this inspection we found the service continued to be ‘Good’.

The service is registered to accommodate and support 14 people. At the time of our inspection 12 people were living in Dunheved Lodge. The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

The service had a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People living at Dunheved Lodge continued to be safe. Staff were trained to safeguard people by recognising signs of abuse and reporting concerns appropriately. People’s risks were assessed and reduced and there were enough suitable staff available to keep people safe. Medicines were administered in line with the prescriber’s instructions. The home was clean and staff followed the provider’s infection control and food safety procedures.

People participated in their assessments and staff made referrals were necessary for people’s specific needs to be assessed by healthcare professionals. Staff were trained and supervised and the registered manager evaluated their performances. People ate well and were supported to access health and social care services whenever they needed to. The registered manager ensured people were treated in line with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and care records were in place to show that restrictions in place were lawful and in people’s best interests.

Staff and people knew each other well and in some instances shared positive relationships for decades. Relatives were made to feel welcome when they visited family members and people were supported to maintain friendships. Staff respected people’s privacy and promoted their dignity.

Detailed care plans were in place to provide staff with guidance on meeting people’s needs and preferences. People’s autistic spectrum, behavioural support and communication needs were met and people were active. The service recognised the need to increase the quality and quantity of activities for people who were at home and did not attend the provider’s day service and had created the role of activity coordinator to lead this. Complaints were dealt with appropriately.

There was an established leadership and good governance at the service. The service worked cooperatively with external agencies to meet people’s needs. Staff felt supported and thought an open culture existed at the service. The provider gathered and acted on the views of people, relatives and staff. The registered manager oversaw quality assurance processes which monitored care and support and drove improvements at the care home.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 21 February 2019

The service remains good.

Effective

Good

Updated 21 February 2019

The service remains good.

Caring

Good

Updated 21 February 2019

The service remains good.

Responsive

Good

Updated 21 February 2019

The service remains good.

Well-led

Good

Updated 21 February 2019

The service remains good.