You are here

Reports


Inspection carried out on 24 July 2017

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on the 24 and 25 July 2017 and was unannounced.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Oak Tree Lodge provides accommodation and support for up to 19 older people who may also be living with dementia. This home is not registered to provide nursing care. At the time of our inspection 17 people were living at the home.

The home is located in Ashurst on the edge of the New Forest in Hampshire. The home has two large living rooms, conservatory / dining area and kitchen. People’s private rooms are on both the ground and first floors. There is a passenger lift to the first floor. The home has a garden and a patio area that people are actively encouraged to use.

Individual care records were stored electronically. Staff had access to electronic data terminals to access and update records accordingly.

The provider had systems in place to respond and manage safeguarding matters and make sure that safeguarding alerts were raised with other agencies.

People who were able to talk with us said that they felt safe in the home and if they had any concerns they were confident these would be quickly addressed by the staff or manager.

Assessments were in place to identify risks that may be involved when meeting people’s needs. Staff were aware of people’s individual risks and was able to tell of the strategies’ in place to keep people safe.

There were sufficient numbers of qualified, skilled and experienced staff deployed to meet people’s needs. Staff were not hurried or rushed and when people requested care or support, this was delivered quickly. The provider operated safe and effective recruitment procedures.

Medicines were stored and administered safely. Clear and accurate medicines records were maintained. Training records showed that staff had completed training in a range of areas that reflected their job role.

Staff received supervision and appraisals were on-going, providing them with appropriate support to carry out their roles.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) monitors the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) which applies to care homes. At the time of our inspection applications had been submitted by the managing authority (care home) to the supervisory body (local authority) and had yet to be authorised. The manager understood when an application should be made and how to submit one.

Where people lacked the mental capacity to make decisions the home was guided by the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 to ensure any decisions were made in the person’s best interests.

People were involved in their care planning, and staff supported people with health care appointments and visits from health care professionals. Care plans were amended to show any changes, and care plans were routinely reviewed to check they were up to date.

People were treated with kindness. Staff were patient and encouraged people to do what they could for themselves, whilst allowing people time for the support they needed.

People knew who to talk to if they had a complaint. Complaints were passed on to the registered manager and recorded to make sure prompt action was taken and lessons were learned which led to improvement in the service.

Inspection carried out on 29 and 30 June 2015

During a routine inspection

Oak Tree Lodge is registered to provide accommodation and support for up to 19 older people who may also be living with dementia. This home is not registered to provide nursing care. On the day of our visit 19 people were living at the home. The home is located in Ashurst on the edge of the New Forest in Hampshire. The home has two large living rooms, conservatory / dining area and kitchen. People’s private rooms are on both the ground and first floors. There is a passenger lift to the first floor. The home has a garden and a patio area that people are actively encouraged to use.

The inspection on 29 and 30 June 2015 was unannounced.

There was a registered manager at the home. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Some areas required improvement. Risk assessments were not always reviewed or updated when peoples needs changed.

Staff understood the needs of the people and care was provided with kindness and compassion. People, relatives and health care professionals told us they were very happy with the care and described the service as excellent. A visiting health care professional told us, “I have the utmost confidence that staff provide excellent care. I have no concerns at all regarding anyone living there. The home always contact us if they are unsure or need advice”.

People were supported to take part in activities they had chosen. One person said, “I love living here. The staff are very kind and look after all of us very well”.

Staff were appropriately trained and skilled to ensure the care delivered to people was safe and effective.

People and relative’s told us they were asked for feedback and encouraged to voice their opinions about the quality of care provided. The home routinely listened and learned from people and visitor experiences through annual resident/ relatives’ survey. The surveys gained the views of people living at the home and their relatives and were used to monitor and where necessary improve the service.

Where people lacked the mental capacity to make decisions the home was guided by the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 to ensure any decisions were made in the person’s best interests.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) monitors the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) which applies to care homes. The registered manager understood when an application should be made and how to submit one. The registered manager was aware of a recent Supreme Court Judgement which widened and clarified the definition of a deprivation of liberty.

Staff talked to people in a friendly and respectful manner. People told us staff had developed good relationships with them and were attentive to their individual needs. Staff respected people’s privacy and dignity at all times and interacted with people in a caring and professional manner. People told us they felt staff were always kind and respectful to them.

Staff told us they were encouraged to raise any concerns about possible abuse. One member of staff said, “We talk about abuse all the time. How to recognise it and what to do if we thought someone was being abused. I know if we have concerns we can speak to the manager and she would report it”.

People and relatives knew how to make a complaint if they needed to. The complaints procedure was displayed in the home. It included information about how to contact the ombudsman, if they were not satisfied with how the service responded to any complaint. There was also information about how to contact the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

We have made a recommendation about how the provider can minimise the risk relating to the health and welfare of people using the service. You will find this in the safe section of this report.

We found one breach of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of this report.

Inspection carried out on 11 September 2013

During a routine inspection

We looked at people's care plans and these contained consent to care and treatment section, which was normally signed by the person receiving the care . For people who used the service but lacked the mental capacity to make a decision we saw that the family of that person and where appropriate a doctor had been involved, and that a best interest decision had been made in respect of that persons care.

Care plans showed that risk assessments had been completed and reviewed on a monthly basis or as people’s needs changed. One person told us: "All the staff are charming and very kind. I really do enjoy living here and the food is good as well". One relative we spoke with said: "Oak Tree Lodge is like a home from home. The staff are very caring and everyone is so friendly".

We observed people at lunch time in the dining room. The atmosphere was pleasant and people were seen to be enjoying the time having lunch and chatting to other residents. We saw that five people needed assistance with their food and this was done by the care workers in a respecting, calming and reassuring way.

The provider had written policies and procedures in relation to safeguarding vulnerable people. We saw the training programme, which showed that care workers attended safeguarding awareness training and this was followed by regular refresher courses. One care worker we spoke with said: "I have never witnessed any form of abuse but if I did I would have no hesitation in reporting it to the manager.

We looked at the service user survey that the provider conducted in July 2013. The results of this survey were positive. We saw a similar survey sent to relatives which had the same result. Comments included for example, ‘The relief of having my relative cared for in such a lovely home is very reassuring’ and ‘Couldn’t wish for a better home’.

Inspection carried out on 1 October 2012

During a routine inspection

During the visit we spoke with five people who use the service and observed the way staff were interacting with people. People told us they were well treated by staff and that they liked the home. We observed staff supporting people to make decisions, for example, about what drinks and snacks to have and what activities to take part in. Staff took the time to listen to people’s requests and to respond to them. Staff provided discreet support for people and ensured that their privacy was maintained when discussing their care needs.

People told us staff provided the care and support that they needed. We saw examples of good staff interactions with people who used the service, for example, responding to questions and supporting people to move to different areas of the home. Staff demonstrated a good understanding of people’s needs and communicated with people in different ways.

People told us all areas of the home were always kept clean and we saw that this was the case during our visit.

People we spoke with during the visit said they were able to raise concerns and complaints with staff and were confident that action would be taken. People were aware that there were formal complaints procedures.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)