You are here

Octavia Housing - James Hill House Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 28 November 2017

This inspection took place on 19 and 21 September 2017 and was announced. The provider was given 24 hours’ notice because the location provides extra care housing and we needed to be sure that people would be available to speak with us. We told the manager we would be returning on the second day. At the last comprehensive inspection in November 2014, with the inspection report being published in April 2015, the service was rated as ‘Good’.

James Hill House provides extra care housing for up to 30 older people with mental health problems, physical or other disabilities. At the time of our visit the service was supporting 28 people, but only providing personal care to 24 of them.

There was a manager in post at the time of our inspection who had recently been recruited and was in the process of completing their application to be a registered manager. They had been a registered manager previously with another provider. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were supported to follow their interests and maintain relationships with friends and family to increase their well-being. There were opportunities for people to take part in a wide range of activities, day trips and events, which included working in partnership with local organisations. There was evidence that cultural requirements were considered when discussing this and making sure these needs were met.

People and their relatives knew how to make a complaint and were able to share their views and opinions about the service they received. The provider made sure people were confident their complaints would be taken seriously and encouraged them to raise any issues or concerns.

An initial assessment was completed from which care plans and risk assessments were developed. Care records were person centred and developed to meet people’s individual needs and discussed regularly during key work sessions. Staff had carried out unique training which helped them to understand more clearly the needs of people living with dementia.

People who required support with their medicines received them safely from staff who had completed training in the safe handling and administration of medicines. Staff completed appropriate records when they administered medicines and these were checked by staff and audited monthly to minimise medicines errors.

People and their relatives told us they felt safe using the service and staff had a good understanding of how to protect people from abuse. Staff were confident that any concerns would be investigated and dealt with.

The service had a robust recruitment process where applicants were assessed against the organisation’s values. Staff had the necessary checks to ensure they were suitable to work with people using the service. People using the service were also involved in the recruitment of staff.

People’s risks were managed effectively and care plans contained appropriate risk assessments which were updated regularly when people’s needs changed.

People were supported to have a healthy and balanced diet, which took into account their preferences as well as medical, cultural and nutritional needs.

Staff received the training and supervision they needed to meet people’s needs and were knowledgeable about their jobs.

People had regular access to healthcare services and other health and social care professionals, such as GPs, dentists and social workers. Concerns about people’s health were discussed at monthly multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings.

People were spoken with and treated in a respectful manner. We saw that staff treated people with respect and kindness, respected their privacy and dignity and promoted their independence.

People and their relatives felt comfortable approaching the service manager, who had a visible presence throughout the service. Staff spoke highly of the working environment and the support they received from management, particularly during a recent restructure.

There were effective quality assurance systems in place to monitor the quality of the service provided and understand the experiences of people who used the service. The provider followed a monthly, quarterly and annual cycle of quality assurance checks and learning took place from the result of the audits.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 28 November 2017

The service remains Good.

Effective

Good

Updated 28 November 2017

The service remains Good.

Caring

Good

Updated 28 November 2017

The service remains Good.

Responsive

Outstanding

Updated 28 November 2017

The service was Outstanding in this regard.

People were supported to follow their interests and encouraged to take part in a range of activities that were made available to them to increase their well-being and reduce social isolation. There was evidence that cultural requirements were considered when discussing people�s care and support and making sure these needs were met.

Care records were personalised, designed to meet people�s individual needs and staff knew how people liked to be supported. Specific training had taken place to help meet the needs of people living with dementia.

The service ensured people had the opportunity to make complaints and encouraged people to raise any concerns they had. People and their relatives knew how to make complaints and said they would feel comfortable doing so. The service gave people using the service and their relatives the opportunity to give feedback about the care and treatment they received.

Well-led

Good

Updated 28 November 2017

The service remains Good.