You are here

Archived: SCA Care (Poole and surrounding areas)

Reports


Inspection carried out on 25 January and 5 February 2013

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

We visited SCA Care (Poole and surrounding areas) on 25 January and 5 February 2013 to review three warning notices related to missed visits or unsafe care or support. The warning notices detailed specific breaches of the Health and Social care Act 2008 (The Regulated Activities Regulations 2010) in relation to supporting people with personal care, nutrition, and the administration of medication. We reviewed a compliance action in respect of the dignity and respect afforded to people who received a service from SCA Care.

We talked to six people who received a service from SCA Care, and seven relatives of people supported by SCA Care. We spoke to the manager, three locality managers and seven care workers. We also received information from the provider and the local authority.

We found the agency was generally polite and respectful when communicating with individuals or their families.

People did not experience care or support that met their needs and protected their rights because people’s care or support was not always delivered in line with their individual care plan.

We found that people were not protected from the risks of inadequate nutrition and dehydration because the provider did not ensure people were always supported to be able to eat and drink sufficient amounts to meet their needs.

People were not protected against the risks associated with medicines because the provider did not have appropriate arrangements in place to manage medicines.

Inspection carried out on 4 December 2012

During an inspection in response to concerns

The purpose of this responsive inspection was to check for compliance in relation to: respecting and involving people, nutrition, medication, and to assess the systems in place to assess and monitor the quality of the service provided.

During the inspection we visited six individuals who received support or care from SCA in their own homes. We also spoke with five relatives of people supported by the domiciliary care agency.

We did not visit the office during this inspection, as this had been undertaken in November 2012. However, we did receive information from a healthcare professional and we spoke with four care workers during the inspection.

People we spoke with told us their views were not always listened to or acted upon, and that they were not generally consulted in relation to any changes to their agreed care or support.

We found that people were not always supported to be able to eat and drink sufficient amounts to meet their needs.

We found that appropriate arrangements were not in place in relation to the recording of medicine. We also found medicines were not safely administered.

There were systems in place to assess and monitor the quality and safety of the service provided by SCA Care, although these were not effective. However, two of the six people we spoke with told us they had experienced some improvements in the provision of their care since our inspection in November 2012.

Inspection carried out on 22 November 2012

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

We visited SCA (Poole and Surrounding areas) (SCA) on 22 November 2012 as an unannounced inspection. The inspection was undertaken to respond to concerns raised that SCA had significant issues planning and delivering care to some vulnerable adults they provided a service for.

We spoke with four people who receive a service from SCA and two relatives. We also spoke with eight members of staff, including an area manager who was addressing some of the care issues SCA were experiencing at the time of the inspection. A care worker said to us “SCA had a really good name and a really good reputation. It is painful so see their current issues”. An individual who received support from the agency said “it’s been horrendous”, and another person said “I have complained but they don’t listen”.

We looked at five care plans and a range of other records.

During this inspection we identified serious shortfalls in care planning and the delivery of support to people. As a result of the inspection we needed to share four vulnerable adult concerns with the local social services department.

Inspection carried out on 18 September 2012

During a routine inspection

We carried out a scheduled inspection between over three days between 13 and 18 September 2012.

The manager had been recently appointed and told us they would be applying to the Care Quality Commission to become the registered manager for SCA. At the time of our inspection there were approximately 163 individuals supported by the agency.

People we spoke with were, in general, very satisfied with the service provided by SCA. Comments we received included “fantastic, lovely staff, I get on with them all” and “I couldn’t wish for better, the carers are very good”.

Staff we spoke with said “the most important thing is we care about our clients”, and “care workers are very empathetic and their heart is in supporting people”. However, records evidenced that care workers did not always receive appropriate support and supervision.

SCA had a range of relevant policies and procedures which included safeguarding vulnerable adults and whistle-blowing. Staff had completed relevant training to ensure they understood how to support individuals.

Medication administration was not always recorded accurately. This meant the provider could not be sure that people had received their medicine as prescribed.

There were suitable quality assurance systems in place to monitor service provision.

People’s personal records were not always kept in a secure environment. This meant the provider could not be sure that people’s confidentiality was maintained.