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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 16 December 2017

The inspection visit took place on the 20 November 2017. This was an unannounced inspection which meant that the staff and provider did not know that we would be visiting.

We last inspected the service on the 3 November 2015 and we rated the service as Good. At this inspection we found the service remained Good.

Oxbridge House is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. Oxbridge House accommodates up to 13 people in one adapted building providing support for people with learning disabilities who may also experience mental health needs. At the time of our inspection visit there were eight people using the service.

The care service had been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Building the Right Support and other best practice guidance. It underpins principles of choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service were living as ordinary a life as any citizen.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We saw for two people who had moved to the service in 2017, they did not have Health Action Plans in place. A Health Action Plan is a requirement from the Department of Health for people with a learning disability and it supports people to remain healthy. We were contacted straight after the inspection by the team leader at the service who informed us these were now in place.

There were systems and processes in place to protect people from the risk of harm. Staff were aware of different types of abuse, what constituted poor practice and action to take if abuse was suspected. People told us they felt safe living at and receiving from the service.

Accidents and incidents had been appropriately recorded and monitored and risk assessments were in place for people who used the service and staff so that they remained as safe as possible.

Appropriate checks of the building and maintenance systems were undertaken to ensure health and safety standards were maintained. We also witnessed staff using appropriate personal protective equipment and cleaning schedules were in place so that risks relating to infection control were well managed.

There were sufficient staff on duty to meet the needs of the people and the staff team were trained and supported to manage any behaviour that may challenge. Medicines were stored and administered in a safe manner.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

We saw that staff were recruited safely and were given appropriate training before they commenced employment. Staff had also received more specific training in managing the needs of people who used the service such as positive behaviour support (PBS) and diabetes.

There was a regular programme of staff supervision in place and records of these were detailed and showed the home worked with staff to identify their personal and professional development. However, some records in relation to staff induction and mandatory training were not instantly accessible as they were in different locations and although we saw staff were trained, records required collating to show they met the regulations.

We saw people’s care plans were person centred and had been well assessed. The home had developed care plans to help people be involved in how they wanted their care and support to be delivered. We saw people were being given choices and encouraged to take part in all aspects of day to day life at the home, from going to work placements to helping to do household cleaning tasks.

People were protected from the risk of poor nutrition and staff were aware of people’s nutritional needs. Care records contained evidence of visits to and from external health care specialists demonstrating that people’s physical health was supported.

The service encouraged people to maintain their independence. People were supported to be involved in the local community as much as possible and were supported to independently use public transport and access facilities such as the local G.P, shops and leisure facilities.

We also saw a regular programme of staff meetings where issues were shared. The service had an easy read complaints procedure and staff told us how they could recognise if someone was unhappy. This showed the service listened to the views of people.

The service regularly used community services and facilities and had links with other local organisations. Staff told us they felt very supported by the registered manager and team leaders and were comfortable raising any concerns. People who used the service, family members and staff were regularly consulted about the quality of the service. People told us that management were approachable, supportive and understanding.

The service had a comprehensive range of audits in place to check the quality and safety of the service and equipment at Oxbridge House and actions plans and lessons learnt reviews were part of their on-going quality review of the service.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 16 December 2017

The service remains Good.

Effective

Good

Updated 16 December 2017

The service remains Good.

Caring

Good

Updated 16 December 2017

The service remains Good.

Responsive

Good

Updated 16 December 2017

The service remains Good.

Well-led

Good

Updated 16 December 2017

The service remains Good.