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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 24 May 2018

The inspection took place on 12 April 2018 and was unannounced. The service was last inspected in March 2017. Following the last inspection, we asked the provider to complete an action plan to show what they would do and by when to improve the key questions of is the service effective, is it responsive? and is it well led?

At the last inspection there was a breach of regulation 13 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. Safeguarding service users from abuse and improper treatment. There was a breach of Regulation 17 of the Care Quality Commission (Registration) Regulations 2009. There was also a breach of regulation 9 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 around Person centred care. Specifically improvements were needed in relation to the Mental Capacity Act 2005 that Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards applications were promptly resubmitted for people when their authorisation had expired. Improvements were also needed, as the registered manager at the time had not submitted notifications of all incidents that affected the health, safety and welfare of people who use the service. Notifications tell us about significant events that happen in the service. We use this information to monitor the service and to check how events have been handled.

121 Watleys End Road is a care home providing personal and nursing care to up to 14 people. There were 13 people living at the home at the time of our inspection. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

The care service has been developed and designed in line with the values that underpin the Registering the Right Support and other best practice guidance. These values include choice, promotion of independence and inclusion. People with learning disabilities and autism using the service can live as ordinary a life as any citizen.

There was a registered manager for the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The registered manager had worked for the provider for a number of years in other services. They had worked at the home for one year.

Medicines were stored securely and administered by staff who had been trained and assessed as competent to do so. Medicines were reviewed regularly to ensure people with complex needs received them appropriately.

The service was responsive to people's needs and they were able to make choices about their day-to-day routines. People had access to a range of activities, which provided them with mental and social stimulation. People were able to go into the community safely.

People were supported to feel safe at the home and with the staff who supported them. There were systems and processes in place to reduce risks to people. These included a thorough recruitment process and ensuring staff knew how to recognise and report abuse. There were enough staff available to meet people's needs in a timely way.

Staff we spoke with understood the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 Staff completed training in a range of areas including safeguarding, moving and handling, basic life support, dementia awareness and health and safety

Staff were caring and kind towards the people they supported. The staff knew people well and understood their needs. However, at certain times during our visit, some staff communication was not fully person centred. Some staff spoke to each other and did not communicate with people when they assisted them. For example, when helping people who were in wheelch

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 24 May 2018

The service remains good

Effective

Good

Updated 24 May 2018

The service has improved to good

The principles of The Mental Capacity Act were understood and promptly acted upon by the staff. This meant people's rights were respected.

People�s needs were met by staff who were competent and properly supported to do their jobs effectively.

People were well supported with their range of individual nutritional and dietary needs and preferences.

Caring

Good

Updated 24 May 2018

The service remains good

Responsive

Good

Updated 24 May 2018

The service had improved to good

Care plans now set out how to provide care and support that was person centred and responsive to teach person�s changing needs.

People were supported both in and out of the home in a way that was suited their needs and was flexible to them.

People were encouraged and supported to enjoy social and therapeutic activities both in the home and the community.

Well-led

Good

Updated 24 May 2018

The service has improved to good

The registered manager was ensuring that Notifications about the service were sent to CQC promptly.

The registered manager was open and inclusive and the home was run in the best interests of people who lived there.

There were quality audit systems in place to check and monitor the quality of the care and the service that people received.

Staff and others were supported and encouraged to make their views known about how the home was run.