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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 15 December 2018

We carried out an unannounced inspection of the service on 6 November 2018. Queenswood is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. This service supports older people.

Queenswood accommodates up to 41 people in one building. At the time of our inspection there were 31 people living at the home. This is the service’s third inspection under its current registration. At the previous inspection on 7 February 2017 we rated the service as Requires Improvement. We also identified one breach of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. During this inspection we checked to see if improvements had been made and we found they had. The service has now improved from Requires Improvement to Good overall.

A registered manager was present during the inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were supported by staff who understood how to protect them from avoidable harm. Risks to people’s safety were assessed and acted on. There were enough staff in place to support people and to keep them safe. People’s medicines were managed safely. The home was clean and tidy and staff understood how to reduce the risk of the spread of infection. Accidents and incidents were regularly reviewed, assessed and investigated by the registered manager and the provider’s senior management team.

People’s physical, mental health and social needs were assessed and met in line with current legislation and best practice guidelines. Staff received regular training and their practice was assessed. Staff felt supported by the registered manager. People were supported to follow a healthy and balanced diet. People had access to external health and social care agencies. The home environment was well maintained and adapted to support people living with a physical disability or living with dementia. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service support this practice.

People liked the staff and found them to be kind and caring. Staff treated people with dignity and respect and people’s privacy was respected. People were supported by staff who understood their needs and supported them with making decisions about their care. People’s diverse needs were respected including promoting people’s access to religious and spiritual guidance. People were encouraged to lead as independent a life as possible. People were provided with information about how they could access independent advocates. There were no restrictions on people’s friends or relatives visiting them. People’s records were handled appropriately and in line with the General Data Protection Regulations.

People care records were person centred and they received care from staff in line with their personal preferences. Care records were regularly reviewed to ensure they continued to meet people’s changing needs. People were treated fairly, without discrimination and systems were in place to support people who had communication needs. Records showed complaints had been dealt with appropriately. People were supported to make decisions about how they wished to be cared for at the end of their life.

The registered manager had made improvements to the home since the last inspection. Robust quality assurances processes were now in place and helped to assure the registered manager that areas for improvement were identified and acted on in good time.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 15 December 2018

The service was safe.

Staff knew how to keep people safe and to reduce risks to their safety. There were enough staff to support people. People’s medicines were managed safely. Staff understood how to reduce the risk of the spread of infection. Accidents and incidents were regularly reviewed, assessed and investigated.

Effective

Good

Updated 15 December 2018

The service was effective.

People received effective support with their health needs. Staff were well trained and their competency was assessed. People were supported to follow a balanced and healthy diet. People had access to external health and social care agencies. Decisions were made with or for people in line with appropriate legislation.

Caring

Good

Updated 15 December 2018

The service was caring.

Staff were caring, treated people with dignity and respect and listened to what they had to say. People’s diverse needs were respected. People were encouraged to lead as independent a life as possible. There were no restrictions on people’s friends or relatives visiting them. People‘s records were handled appropriately and in line with the General Data Protection Regulation.

Responsive

Good

Updated 15 December 2018

The service was responsive.

People were cared for in line with their personal preferences. People had access to a wide range of activities. Efforts had been made to ensure information was provided for people in a way they could understand. Records showed complaints had been dealt with appropriately. People were supported to make decisions about their end of life care.

Well-led

Good

Updated 15 December 2018

The service was well led.

The home was led by an enthusiastic registered manager who had overseen improvements to the quality of the care people received. Robust quality assurance processes were now in place. Staff felt valued and enjoyed their role. People, relatives and staff were encouraged to give their views about how the home could be improved and developed.