You are here

Merrie Loots Farm Residential Home Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 15 January 2019

We inspected the service on 22 November 2018. The inspection was unannounced.

Merrie Loots Farm Residential Home is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. The service accommodates 28 people.

On the day of our inspection 27 people were using the service.

At our last inspection on 11 and 12 April 2016 we rated the service ‘good.’ At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of ‘good’ overall. There was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

People were protected from avoidable harm by a staff team trained and confident to recognise and report any concerns. Potential risks to people were assessed and minimised.

Staff were only employed after satisfactory pre-employment checks had been obtained. There were enough staff to ensure people’s needs were met safely and in a timely manner.

People were supported to manage their prescribed medicines by staff who were trained and had been assessed as competent to administer medicines. Staff followed the provider’s procedures to prevent the spread of infection and reduce the risk of cross contamination.

Staff knew the people they cared for well and understood, and met, their needs. People received care from staff who were trained and well supported to meet people’s assessed needs. Staff had the skills and knowledge to provide effective care.

People were supported by staff to have enough to eat and drink. People were assisted to have access to external healthcare services to help maintain their health and well-being Staff worked within and across organisations to deliver effective care and support.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. The policies and systems in the service supported this practice. People were fully involved in making decisions about their care and support. People and their relatives were involved in the setting up and review of their or their family member’s individual support and care plans.

Staff treated people in a kind and friendly way. Staff respected and promoted people’s privacy, dignity and independence.

People’s individual needs were assessed and staff used this information to deliver personalised care that met people’s needs. People were supported to engage in meaningful activity and with the local community. People’s religious and cultural beliefs were respected and supported.

Staff supported people to have the most comfortable, dignified, and pain-free a death as possible. Staff worked in partnership with other professionals to ensure that people received joined-up care.

People’s suggestions and complaints were listened to, investigated, and acted upon to reduce the risk of recurrence.

Staff liked working for the service. They were clear about their role to provide people with a high-quality service and uphold the service’s values.

The registered manager sought feedback about the quality of the service provided from people. Audits and quality monitoring checks were carried out to help drive forward improvements.

Further information is in the detailed findings below.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 15 January 2019

The service remains good.

Effective

Good

Updated 15 January 2019

The service remains good.

Caring

Good

Updated 15 January 2019

The service remains good.

Responsive

Good

Updated 15 January 2019

The service remains good.

Well-led

Good

Updated 15 January 2019

The service remains good.