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Inspection carried out on 3 July 2017

During a routine inspection

Meyrin House provides accommodation and personal care for up to 18 older people. An unannounced inspection was carried out on 3 and 5 July 2017. Some people living at Meyrin House had care needs associated with living with dementia. At the time of our inspection, 13 people were living at the service.

The home did not have a registered manager in place. However prior to the inspection taking place we had received an application from the current home manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Arrangements in place to keep the provider up to date with what was happening in the service were not effective. As a result, there was a lack of positive leadership and managerial oversight.

The manager could not demonstrate how the service was being run in the best interests of people living there. Systems in place to identify and monitor the safety and quality of the service were ineffective, as they either did not recognise the shortfalls or when they did there was a lack of action to rectify them.

Views about staffing levels were mixed and some people felt that there was not enough trained and experienced staff available to meet their needs. We also found that people or their families were not fully involved in planning and making decisions about their care. We found the service not to be responsive in identifying and meeting people's individual care needs.

Staff did not have the skills and experience, and they were not deployed effectively to meet the needs of people. We found that staff did not always have enough time to spend with people to provide reassurance, interest and stimulation. There was a lack of knowledge around supporting and caring for people living with dementia including understanding how it affected people differently and how each individual should be cared for to promote their wellbeing as far as possible.

The dining experience was varied as it did not meet all the people's individual nutritional needs. As a result, the manager was unable to demonstrate that people had enough to eat and drink to support their overall health and wellbeing.

Although some of the relatives told us that staff treated people with kindness and were caring, we found the way the service was provided was not consistently caring. Staff did not always demonstrate a caring attitude towards the people they supported and some failed to promote people's dignity or show respect to individuals. The majority of interactions by staff were routine, task orientated, and we could not be assured that people who remained in their bedroom received appropriate care to meet their needs. This also meant they were socially isolated as opportunities provided for people to engage in social activities were limited.

Whilst we were concerned that some staff did not always recognise poor practice, suitable arrangements were in place to respond appropriately, where an allegation of abuse had been made. Systems in place to deal with people's comments and complaints were not effectively being used. Records we reviewed confirmed this.

You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.

Inspection carried out on 28 November 2016

During a routine inspection

Meyrin house provides accommodation and personal care for up to 18 older people. An unannounced inspection was carried out on the 28 and 29 November 2016. Some people living at Meyrin had care needs associated with living with dementia. At the time of our inspection 15 people were living at the service.

The service was last inspected in May 2016 where the Commission highlighted a number of concerns and imposed positive conditions as to drive improvement within service. The provider wrote to us with actions they had taken since to improve the service. The service was previously rated inadequate overall and placed in special measures. Although vast improvements had been made since our last inspection, at this inspection the service has been rated as requires improvement as the provider will have to show sustained improvement and continued good care for the rating of the service to be changed following another inspection.

The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. However during the inspection the registered manager informed they would be living in the coming weeks. The provider informed contingencies would be put in place to ensure the continued improvement of the service since our last inspection.

The service had made improvements to ensure staff delivered support that was effective and caring and this was in a way which promoted people’s independence and wellbeing, whilst people’s safety was ensured. Staff were recruited and employed upon completion of appropriate checks as part of a robust recruitment process. Sufficient numbers of staff enabled people’s individual needs to be met adequately.

Staff understood their responsibilities and how to keep people safe. People’s rights were also protected because management and staff understood the legal framework of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

The manager and staff ensured access to healthcare services were readily available to people and worked with a range of health professionals, such as social workers, community mental health nurses and GPs to implement care and support plans.

Staff were respectful and compassionate towards people ensuring privacy and dignity was valued. People were supported in a person centred way by staff who understood their roles in relation to encouraging independence whilst mitigating potential risks. People were supported to identify their own interests and pursue them with the assistance of staff. Person centred social activities took place within the service.

Systems were in place to make sure that people’s views were gathered. These included regular meetings, direct interactions with people and questionnaires being distributed to people, relatives and healthcare professionals. The service was assisted to run effectively by the use of quality monitoring audits carried out by the manager and provider, which identified any improvements needed and actions were taken. A complaints procedure was in place and had been implemented appropriately by the management team.

Inspection carried out on 26 May 2016

During a routine inspection

Meyrin house provides accommodation and personal care for up to 18 older people. An unannounced inspection was carried out on 26 May 2016 and 31 May 2016. Some people living at Meyrin House had care needs associated with living with dementia. At the time of our inspection 15 people were living at the service.

The overall rating for this service is 'Inadequate' and the service is therefore in 'Special measures'.

Services in special measures will be kept under review and, if we have not taken immediate action to propose to cancel the provider's registration of the service, will be inspected again within six months.

The expectation is that providers found to have been providing inadequate care should have made significant improvements within this timeframe. If not enough improvement is made within this timeframe so that there is still a rating of inadequate for any key question or overall, we will take action in line with our enforcement procedures to begin the process of preventing the provider from operating this service. This will lead to cancelling their registration or to varying the terms of their registration within six months if they do not improve. This service will continue to be kept under review and, if needed, could be escalated to urgent enforcement action. Where necessary, another inspection will be conducted within a further six months, and if there is not enough improvement so there is still a rating of inadequate for any key question or overall, we will take action to prevent the provider from operating this service. This will lead to cancelling their registration or to varying the terms of their registration.

For adult social care services the maximum time for being in special measures will usually be no more than 12 months. If the service has demonstrated improvements when we inspect it and it is no longer rated as inadequate for any of the five key questions it will no longer be in special measures.

The home had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered Managers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The manager could not demonstrate how the service was being run in the best interests of people living there. Arrangements in place to keep the provider up to date with what was happening in the service were not effective. As a result there was a lack of positive leadership and managerial oversight. Systems in place to identify and monitor the safety and quality of the service were ineffective as they either did not recognise the shortfalls or when they did there was a lack of action to rectify them.

Staff did not have the skills and experience, and they were not deployed effectively to meet the needs of people. We found that staff did not always have enough time to spend with people to provide reassurance, interest and stimulation. There was a lack of knowledge around supporting and caring for people living with dementia including understanding how it affected people differently and how each individual should be cared for to promote their wellbeing as far as possible.

Views about staffing levels were mixed and some people felt that there was not enough trained and experienced staff available to meet their needs. We also found that people or their families were not fully involved in planning and making decisions about their care. We found the service not to be responsive in identifying and meeting people'

Inspection carried out on 29 August 2013

During a routine inspection

People told us that they felt comfortable living in Meyrin House. One person said, �I am quite happy here. I have a nice room and everything I need." People told us that they could follow their own routines, were offered choices about their care, and that staff treated them kindly. Staff spoken with had an understanding of people's individual needs. People were treated respectfully and their individuality understood.

We found that people's needs were assessed and planned for to ensure that their individual needs would be met. New care planning and recording systems had been put in place which made it easier to understand people's needs and to follow their progress.

We found that the service was kept clean and pleasant for people to live in. Routines in place ensured that people were protected, as far as possible, from the risk of infection.

People told us that the staff who worked at the service were good. One person said, "The staff are kind and caring." We found that levels of staff training could be improved. This would ensure that all staff consistently have the skills and knowledge needed to carry out their role effectively and safely. Plans were in place to address this.

People told us that they were happy with the quality of the service provided. We found that the provider had processes in place to monitor the quality and safety of the service.

Overall Meyrin house offered a service that was safe, effective, caring, responsive and well led.

Inspection carried out on 24 September 2012

During an inspection looking at part of the service

People living in Meyrin House looked relaxed and comfortable. They told us that they liked living there and that the staff were kind.

Inspection carried out on 18 June 2012

During a routine inspection

People told us that they were happy and comfortable living in Meyrin House. They told us that the food was good and that they liked their rooms.

People said that the staff were kind to them and supported them well.

Inspection carried out on 6 March 2012

During a routine inspection

People using the service told us that they were happy living at Meyrin House and that they felt satisfied with the care and support they were offered.

People said that they liked the food provided and told us they were offered choice about what they ate.

People told us that the staff were friendly and caring.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)