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We are carrying out a review of quality at Dove Court Care Home. We will publish a report when our review is complete. Find out more about our inspection reports.

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Outstanding

Updated 10 September 2016

The inspection took place on 21 and 22 June 2016 and was unannounced. We had previously inspected the service in August 2014 and found no breaches of regulations in the standards inspected.

Dove Court is a 32 bed residential care home, 30 people lived there when we visited. It provides accommodation with personal care to older people but does not provide nursing care.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People consistently told us about the excellent care they received. People mattered, staff were patient, and they demonstrated empathy in their conversations with people and in how they spoke about them. The service had received numerous compliments and an award for their caring ethos.

Staff developed exceptionally positive caring and compassionate relationships with people. The ethos of the home was that of an extended family. People were treated with dignity and respect and staff were caring and compassionate towards them. Staff had signed up to the national ‘Dignity in care’ initiative and were committed to taking action, to uphold the ten good practice steps to demonstrate compassion and respect for people. Staff knew each person as an individual and what mattered to them. Consistently positive feedback from people and relatives meant Dove Court had received a top 20 care home award from the care homes association for the past two consecutive years. People having end of life care were kept peaceful, and pain free.

People, relatives and professionals consistently gave us positive feedback about how the service was personalised to meet people’s individual needs. Staff supported people with communication difficulties in innovative ways. Staff knew each person as an individual, their preferences and interests. The home had a wide range of activities suited to the individual needs of people which brought pleasure to their lives which enhanced people’s health and wellbeing. People were part of their local community and participated in local events. People’s wellbeing had improved because staff and volunteers had befriended and engaged with people in ways that prevented them becoming isolated. Comments included, “He is so happy now that he has people to talk to and activities to join in with” and “ She has a new lease for living which is so good to see.”

People experienced effective care and support that promoted their health and wellbeing from staff that had the knowledge and skills needed to carry out their role. People were supported by enough skilled staff so their care and support could be provided at a time and pace convenient for them. Each person’s needs were assessed and care records had personalised information about how to meet them. Care was focused on people’s wishes and preferences and people were supported to remain active and independent. People praised the quality of food, and were offered a well-balanced diet. Health and social care professionals gave us positive feedback about the care and support of people.

People were supported to express their views and were involved in decision making about their care and were offered day to day choices. Staff sought people’s consent for care and treatment and ensured they were supported to make as many decisions as possible. Staff confidently used the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). Where people lacked capacity, capacity relatives, friends and relevant professionals were involved in best interest decision making.

People said they felt safe living at the home. Staff were aware of signs of abuse and knew how to report concerns; any concerns reported were investigated. A robust recr

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 10 September 2016

The service was safe.

Staff knew how to recognise signs of potential abuse and how to report it.

Risks to people were managed to reduce them as much as possible, whilst respecting people’s freedom and independence.

People were supported by enough skilled staff so their care and support could be provided at a time and pace convenient for them. Suitable staff was recruited to meet people’s needs.

People received their medicines on time and in a safe way.

Accidents and incidents were reported and actions were taken to reduce risks of recurrence.

Effective

Good

Updated 10 September 2016

The service was effective.

People experienced a level of care and support that promoted their health and wellbeing.

People were cared for by skilled and experienced staff. Staff had regular training and received support with practice through supervision and appraisals.

People’s consent to care and treatment was sought. Staff confidently used the Mental Capacity Act (2005) (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) and understood how these applied to their practice.

People were supported to eat a well-balanced diet. Staff used a variety of ways to ensure people who were reluctant to eat and drink were encouraged and supported to do so.

Caring

Outstanding

Updated 10 September 2016

The service was caring.

People and relatives consistently said staff developed exceptionally positive, caring and compassionate relationships with them. People mattered, staff made sure people were able to maintain relationships with those that mattered to them. The service had received numerous compliments and an award for their caring ethos.

The ethos of care was person-centred and valued each person as an individual. Staff were exceptionally skilled at helping people to express their views and communicated with them in ways they could understand.

People could express their views and make decisions, which staff acted on. People privacy, dignity and independence was respected.

People receiving end of life care were treated with dignity, kept peaceful, and pain free. Families and those that mattered to the person were supported to spend quality time with them.

Responsive

Outstanding

Updated 10 September 2016

The service was responsive.

People received exceptionally person centred care from staff who knew each person, about their life and what mattered to them. They experienced a level of care and support that promoted their health and wellbeing and enhanced their quality of life.

Staff had excellent skills and supported people with communication difficulties in innovative ways. People were encouraged to socialise, pursue their interests and hobbies and try new things in a variety of inspiring innovative ways.

People were partners in their care and care records were individual, comprehensive and detailed. People’s views were actively sought, listened to and acted on.

People knew how to raise concerns, which were listened and positively responded to and were used to make further improvements.

Well-led

Good

Updated 10 September 2016

The service well led.

The provider promoted care, comfort and companionship for people. The culture of the home was open and inclusive and staff worked effectively with people, relatives, and other professionals.

The service was well organised and provided a consistently high quality of care. Staff worked together as a team to support people and they felt valued.

People, relatives expressed high levels of confidence in the management and leadership at the service.