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Inspection carried out on 14 August 2018

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 14 August 2018 and was announced. At our last inspection in December 2015 we rated the service Good. At this inspection we found evidence continued to support the rating of Good. There was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

“Patrick Carr” is a 'care home'. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

“Patrick Carr” is registered to provide care for up to 3 older people who have a learning disability.There was one person living in the home at the time of this inspection. The provider informed us that they planned to continue to provide care to only one person. The provider is a husband and wife team who live in the house which is registered as a care home.

There was a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were safe living at the service and risks were managed effectively to keep people safe and protect their rights. The provider had effective systems in place to protect people from abuse and had responded appropriately to safeguarding risks.

The providers were experienced and had completed relevant training to support them to provide effective care. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and the service supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice. People had choice around what they ate, how they spent their time and had support to maintain good health.

People had good support to maintain their independence and their right to privacy was respected. The service helped people with maintaining relationships with their families. People were involved in planning their care. The service ensured care plans were person centred and updated as and when people’s care needs changed. People led their chosen lifestyle. Systems were in place to manage complaints.

People told us they were happy with the service. The service maintained clear records of care provided, people’s health and wellbeing. The providers were continually improving the service and worked in partnership with health and social care professionals to ensure people’s health and social care needs were met.

Further information is in the detailed findings below.

Inspection carried out on 21 December 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 21 December 2015 and was unannounced. At our last inspection on 5 February 2014 the service met all the standards we looked at.

Patrick Carr is a care home that provides accommodation and care to a maximum of three people over the age of 65 who have a learning disability. On the day of the inspection there were two people living at the home. The providers are a husband and wife team who live in the same domestic property with the two people using the service. These two people have been at the provider’s home for between 16 and 20 years and everyone knows each other very well. The providers told us that they would not be admitting any new people to their home.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt the service was safe and had no concerns about how they were being supported at the home. They told us that both providers were kind and respectful and their needs were being met.

The providers had identified and highlighted potential risks to people’s safety and had thought about and recorded how these risks could be reduced.

The providers understood the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and told us that people could generally make their own decisions about their care and treatment. The providers understood that, where major decisions needed to be made, a best interests meeting would need to be arranged.

People had good access to healthcare professionals such as doctors, dentists, chiropodists and opticians and any changes to people’s needs were responded to appropriately and quickly.

People told us the providers listened to them and respected their choices and decisions.

People confirmed that they were asked about the quality of the service and had made comments about this. People felt the providers took their views into account in order to improve service delivery.

Inspection carried out on 5 February 2014

During a routine inspection

We spoke with the registered manager, care manager, one relative and one person who lived at the home on the day of our inspection. We were told by a person who lived there they, "liked living here." and they enjoyed, "going out to see my friends and going to the library," A relative told us they were, "happy with the care and had no concerns."

People's privacy and dignity were respected. We observed the care manager knocking before entering a persons' room, asking and waiting for permission before entering. We noted the person had their own bathroom, television and tea making facilities.

People's care records we looked at showed that external healthcare professionals along with people and the staff at the home were involved in planning and delivering people's care and welfare needs. We found risk assessments ensured people were kept safe whilst maintaining their independence.

Appropriate arrangements were in place in relation to obtaining, safe keeping and administering medicines.

We found both the registered manager and care manager were experienced and knowledgeable to deliver effective care and support to both people who lived in the home. The care manager told us they were able to link up with local respite residential care homes when their support was required or in the event of an emergency.

We found records contained appropriate information in relation to care and treatment of people who used the service.

Inspection carried out on 26 March 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with two people on the day of the inspection and they spoke positively about the home. One person said "I like it here, I get to keep to myself."

People were encouraged to go into the community and pursue their own activities. One person said "I like going to the library and to the pub to see my friends." Another person told us that they like going out in the car and going to the local market.

People's privacy and dignity were respected. We observed in one person's room how they had their own tea making facilities.

Care plans recorded individual needs and wishes. They were regularly reviewed to reflect any changes.

The provider requested criminal records checks for staff, however, these had not been updated since 2002. The staff were appropriately qualified.

Both people we spoke with knew how to make a complaint and we saw evidence that they were given clear information on how to do this.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)