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Scalford Court Care Home Requires improvement

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Requires improvement

Updated 3 January 2019

This inspection took place on 30 October 2018 and was unannounced.

This was the second comprehensive inspection; the last inspection was rated Good in April 2016.

Scalford Court Care Home is a care home. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection. The care home accommodates up to 59 people. On the day of our visit, there were 54 people using the service.

The service did not have a registered manager, a previous manager and a newly appointed home manager were manging the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

The provider had not ensured that people were always protected from health and safety risks associated with accessing areas such as the kitchen and laundry; they took immediate action to protect people at the time of the inspection site visit.

Staffing levels ensured that people's care and support needs were safely met most of the time; the provider was continuing to employ staff. Safe recruitment processes were in place. People received care from staff that had received training and support to carry out their roles. People were supported to have enough to eat and drink to maintain their health and well-being.

Staff understood their roles and responsibilities to safeguard people from the risk of harm. Risk assessments were in place and were reviewed regularly; people received their care as planned to mitigate their assessed risks.

People had developed positive relationships with staff. Staff had a good understanding of people's needs and preferences.

People were supported to access relevant health and social care professionals. There were systems in place to manage medicines in a safe way.

Staff demonstrated their understanding of the Mental Capacity Act, 2005 (MCA). Staff gained people's consent before providing personal care. People were involved in the planning of their care which was person centred and updated regularly.

People were encouraged to make decisions about how their care was provided and their privacy and dignity were protected and promoted. People had developed positive relationships with staff. Staff had a good understanding of people's needs and preferences.

People were supported to express themselves, their views were acknowledged and acted upon and care and support was delivered in the way that people chose and preferred.

People using the service and their relatives knew how to raise a concern or make a complaint. There was a complaints system in place and people were confident that any complaints would be responded to appropriately.

There was a very positive culture within the home where staff communicated well and people’s needs were met. The provider had achieved a gold award from the quality team at the local authority and investors in people.

This is the first time the service has been rated Requires Improvement.

Further information is in the detailed findings below.

You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection, by selecting the 'all reports' link for Scalford Court Care Home on our website at www.cqc.org.uk

Inspection areas

Safe

Requires improvement

Updated 3 January 2019

The service was not always safe.

People were not always protected from the risks associated with health and safety.

There were enough staff deployed most of the time to meet people’s needs.

People received care from staff that knew how to safeguard people from abuse.

People's risks assessments were reviewed regularly and as their needs changed.

The provider followed safe recruitment procedures.

Staff followed safe medicines management.

Effective

Good

Updated 3 January 2019

The service was effective.

Staff received the training and support they required to carry out their roles.

People’s care was delivered in line with current legislation, standards and evidence based guidance.

People were supported to eat and drink enough to maintain a balanced diet.

People's consent was sought before staff provided care.

Caring

Good

Updated 3 January 2019

The service was caring.

People were treated with kindness and respect by staff.

People were supported to be involved in planning their care.

People's privacy and dignity were maintained and respected.

Responsive

Good

Updated 3 January 2019

The service was responsive.

People received care that met their needs.

The provider had systems in place to respond to peoples’ complaints.

People received care that met their needs at their end of life.

Well-led

Requires improvement

Updated 3 January 2019

The service was not always well led.

There was no registered manager.

The provider had systems in place to monitor, assess and make improvements to the health, safety, welfare and quality of care of people using the service.