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Pinford End House Nursing Home Good

Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

This inspection took place on 31 August and 3 September 2018 and was unannounced.

Pinford End House Nursing Home is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

The service is registered to accommodate up to 40 people who require nursing and/or personal care. At the time of the inspection 32 people were living at the home.

At our last inspection in January 2016 we rated the service good. The safe section of the report was rated as ‘requires improvement.’ This was because when people were prescribed medicines on a ‘when required’ basis, for example pain relief, or when they were prescribed variable doses, for example ‘one or two tablets’, we found that staff did not always record the number of tablets administered. This meant that it was not possible to conduct an accurate stock check of medicines. At this inspection we saw action had been taken to resolve this issue.

At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the CQC to manage the home. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the home is run.

People were helped to take their medicines by staff who were trained and had been assessed to be competent to administer medicines.

People were supported to be kept safe because the staff continued to follow relevant policies and had appropriate training. People’s risk assessments had been written and were reviewed regularly to minimise the potential risk of harm to people during the delivery of their care.

Staff wore protective clothing such as gloves and aprons when needed. This reduced the risk of cross infection.

People were looked after by enough qualified nursing and care staff, who were trained and supervised to support them with their individual needs. Staff were supported through supervision, training and an annual appraisal. Pre-employment checks were completed on new staff before they were assessed to be suitable to look after people who used the service.

The nursing and care needs of people were assessed prior to them coming to the service and those needs were reviewed on a regular basis and more frequently should that be deemed necessary. Care plans gave staff information on how to support people with their needs.

People had access to healthcare professionals and their healthcare needs had been met. Care records seen confirmed visits to and from General Practitioners (GP's) and other healthcare professionals had been recorded.

People continue to be offered choices and were supported to eat and drink sufficient amounts of food and drink and the ttaff knew the people they supported and provided support in a caring way that promoted their dignity.

Staff were able to demonstrate their understanding of the principles of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005 and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS); these provide legal safeguards for people who may be unable to make their own decisions. People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People participated in a range of activities within the accommodation and also in the gardens of the service and received the support they needed to help them to do this. Peopl

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The service has improved to Good.

The service had clear medicine polices for the administration of medicines on a ‘when needed’ basis and effective monitoring of medicines stocks to ensure people received their medicines as prescribed.

There were enough staff to provide care to the people living at the service.

Each person had a risk assessment which clearly explained how staff were to support them.

Effective

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The service remains Good.

Caring

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The service remains Good.

Responsive

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The service remains Good.

Well-led

Good

Updated 11 October 2018

The service remains Good.