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Inspection carried out on 6 February 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service:

Redcourt Care Home is a residential care home located in Aigburth, a residential area of Liverpool. It provides personal care and accommodation for up to 53 people who are living with dementia. At the time of our inspection there were 48 people living at the home.

People’s experience of using this service:

Where people lacked the capacity to make particular decisions, they were supported to have maximum choice and control over their lives and were supported by staff in the least restrictive way possible. However, we found that the home did not maintain clear documentation relating to mental capacity assessments and decisions made in a person’s best interests. We discussed this with the registered manager, who was aware this was an area they needed to improve in and was already in the process of addressing this.

There were systems in place to protect people from abuse and people living at the home and their relatives told us that they felt safe there. One relative said, “Safe? Very much so, we’re made up with the place.”

The home was well-maintained and the safety of the environment was regularly checked by staff. The home had a variety of up-to-date safety certificates that demonstrated that utilities and services, such as gas and electric had been tested and maintained.

Staff were safely recruited by the home. Records showed that the required pre-employment checks, such as criminal records checks, had been carried out. This ensured that only people who were suitable to work with vulnerable adults were employed by the home.

Medication was correctly administered, stored and recorded at the home by staff who had the required knowledge and skills.

Staff were well-supported with regular supervisions and annual appraisals with the registered manager. Most staff were up-to-date with training relevant to their roles and we found that staff who required refresher training had been booked to do so.

People living at the home were supported by staff to maintain a healthy and balanced diet. People and their relatives gave us positive feedback about the quality and choice of food available at the home. One person said, “Thumbs up, very good we are very well fed and the food is to a high standard, we are very lucky.”

All the people and relatives we spoke with gave us positive feedback about the staff at the home. A relative commented, “The staff are great, they look after people so well.” Staff knew the people they were supporting well, including their needs and preferences. We observed many warm, friendly and caring interactions between staff and the people living at the home throughout our inspection.

The care plans we looked at were detailed and informative, regularly reviewed and reflected the needs of the people living at the home. This helped staff get to know the people they were supporting and we found the staff we spoke with knew people well.

There was a good range of activities on offer to people living at the home. Examples of this included, arts and crafts, baking, dancing, singing and ball games. One person told us, “We have a singing group me and another lad started it. We sang at Christmas. We do quizzes and bingo we are very active.”

The interactions we saw between staff and people living at the home showed there was a positive and caring culture amongst staff at the home. People and their relatives told us they felt the home was well-led. One relative said, “I suppose from the attitude of the staff they are friendly, helpful and approachable and they have a low turnover of staff with members of staff who have been there years and so they must be happy with the way they are managed.”

The registered manager had various systems in place to monitor and improve the quality and safety of service being provided at the home They also gathered feedback about the service through quarterly carers’ meetings, a registered manager’s surgery and annual satisfaction questionnaires.

Rating at last inspection

Inspection carried out on 12 July 2016

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 12 July 2016 and was unannounced. Redcourt Care Home is located in Aigburth, a residential area of Liverpool, and provides support for up to fifty three people who are living with dementia. The home has a car park at the front and is surrounded by mature gardens.

The home had a manager who was registered with the Care Quality Commission. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We found that the people living at Redcourt Care Home were treated with dignity and

respect and supported to make everyday choices. People had a choice of meals and received the support they needed to eat and drink. Staff we spoke with had a good understanding and knowledge of people`s individual care needs and there was good communication between staff and people’s families.

The home was clean, tidy, comfortable and safe. Adaptations had been made to support people

with mobility difficulties and help them to find their way around.

During the day of our visit there were enough staff on duty and people did not have to wait for staff to attend to them. The rotas we looked at confirmed that these staffing levels were maintained by using agency staff as needed.

Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) had been applied for appropriately and most of these were awaiting authorisation by the local authority. Family members visited during the day with no restrictions.

Care records we looked at showed that people’s care and support needs were assessed and planned for and the plans were reviewed regularly.

The home employed an activities organiser and a wide range of age-appropriate activities was provided.

We saw evidence that regular staff meetings and family meetings took place. A significant number of satisfaction questionnaires had been circulated and returned during 2015. We saw records of a series of quality monitoring audits that were carried out.

Inspection carried out on 19 December 2013

During a routine inspection

We used a number of methods to help us understand the experiences of people using the service; this was because some of the people using the service had complex needs which meant they were not able to tell us their experiences. We used a formal way to observe people to help us understand how their needs were supported. We call this the 'Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI). We also spent time observing the general care and support provided to people. We had individual discussions with five visiting relatives and two of the people living there and spoke with six members of staff who held different roles within the home.

We found that the people living at Redcourt Care Home were treated with dignity and respect and supported to make everyday choices. We also found that they had received the support they had needed with their care and welfare.

People were complimentary about the meals provided. We found that people received support to eat and drink, they had a choice of meals and any changes to their food or drink intake had been quickly noted and monitored.

The home was clean, tidy and comfortable. Adaptations had been made to support people with their mobility and to find their way around more easily.

Recruitment processes had improved with systems introduced to the home to ensure staff recruited were suitable to work with people who may be vulnerable.

Systems were in place for enabling people to raise concerns or complaints.

Inspection carried out on 18 October 2013

During an inspection in response to concerns

We did not speak directly to people who use the service regarding this outcome.

The registered manager failed in relation to their responsibilities by not providing the appropriate risk management and supervision of staff.

Inspection carried out on 24 August 2012

During a routine inspection

We used a number of different methods to help us understand the experiences of people using the service, because the people using the service had complex needs which meant they were not able to tell us their experiences.

During our visit we met with five of the people living at Redcourt Care Home and seven of their relatives. We also met with other people living there and observed the support provided to them.

In addition we spoke with seven members of staff who held various roles within the home.

Relatives told us that in their opinion people had received the support they needed with their personal care. They said that in their opinion there had been sufficient staff available to provide the support people needed. In discussions relatives also told us that they believed people living at Redcourt Care Home had benefited from the varied activity programme made available and that they felt involved in peoples care and staff kept them informed.

One of the people living at Redcourt Care Home told us, “I love it here” and a relative commented, “It’s lovely, really nice”.

Inspection carried out on 1 March 2012

During an inspection in response to concerns

When we write our inspection reports we generally include the views and comments of the people using the service. This ensures we are reflecting their experiences and the support they receive. However, many of the people at Redcourt Care Home could not communicate verbally. We spent time observing the support they received and speaking to relatives.

Relatives we spoke with were happy with the home. Relatives told us the staff were always respectful and very helpful. They knew about the complaints system and knew they could always talk to the manager if they had any concerns. The relatives said they had never had any concerns or issues about the care received.

Inspection carried out on 19 July 2011

During an inspection in response to concerns

The people living at Redcourt Care Home told us that staff keep the home ‘spotless’. They said staff are always cleaning.

Staff told us that they have enough equipment and supplies to clean the home effectively and that they get the training and support they need to enable them to maintain the home hygienically. Staff were able to tell us about the different cleaning products available and said that they found these effective in dealing with any cleaning tasks and in neutralising any odours that occurred. They told us that carpets are regularly shampooed to reduce odours.

Inspection carried out on 1 March 2011

During a routine inspection

When we visited Redcourt as part of this review we talked to a number of the people who live there. Everyone who lives at the home has dementia to a greater or lesser extent so the information they could give us directly was limited. People’s individual rooms varied in size and the extent to which they were personalised depended largely on the contribution made by their relatives. Most of the rooms we looked at reflected in some way the personality and history of the person who lived there. All were clean and there were no unpleasant odours. People appeared to enjoy their breakfast apart from a few residents who were unable to join in the first sitting. One lady we talked to was uncertain and uneasy as she waited for a seat. If both dining areas are used there are enough seats to accommodate everyone, but more staff need to be deployed at mealtimes for this to happen. People readily joined in with activities in the afternoon and the results of some earlier activities (especially in relation to Valentine’s Day) were displayed on the walls. We spoke to some relatives who were visiting the home and they felt that their relative was being well cared for.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)