You are here

Archived: Cornerways Residential Home Good

The provider of this service changed - see new profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 18 July 2017

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 18 July 2017 and was unannounced. The previous inspection was carried out in June 2016. At that inspection concerns were identified about some aspects of staff recruitment processes. We also found some records of safety checks and people’s care needs were not fully completed. At that time we asked the provider to send us an action plan about the changes they would make to address these concerns. At this inspection we found the required action had been taken to make the improvements needed.

Cornerways is registered to provide personal care and accommodation for up to 20 people. There were 18 people using the service during our inspection, who were living with a range of health and support needs. Cornerways is a detached house situated within the town of Hythe and with close access to the town centre. The service is arranged over three floors, each person had their own bedroom apart from one room, shared by a married couple. Access to the first floor is by a shaft lift with stair lifts to the remaining floor, making stair free access to all areas of the service.

The service had a registered manager, who was present throughout the inspection. They shared their time between this service and another one owned locally by the same provider, where they are also the registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Staff followed correct and appropriate procedures in the storage and dispensing of medicines. People were supported in a safe environment and risks identified for people were managed in a way that enabled people to live as independent a life as possible. People were supported to maintain good health and attended appointments and check-ups. Health needs were kept under review and appropriate referrals were made when required.

A robust system to recruit new staff was in place and made sure staff employed to support people were fit and suitable to be working at the service. There were sufficient numbers of staff on duty to make sure people were safe and received the care and support that they needed.

Staff had completed induction training when they first started work at the service. Staff were supported during their induction, monitored and assessed to check that they had gained the right skills and knowledge to support people in a way that met their needs. Staff continued to receive training and support. There were staff meetings, staff could discuss any issues and share new ideas with their colleagues, to improve people’s care and lives.

People were protected from the risk of abuse because staff had received safeguarding training and were aware of how to recognise and report safeguarding concerns. Staff knew about whistle blowing and were confident they could raise any concerns with the provider or outside agencies if needed.

The care and support needs of each person were different and their care plan was individual to them. Personalised care plans, risk assessments and guidance were in place to help staff to support people. People's legal rights were protected as staff provided care in line with the Mental Capacity Act (2005). Staff followed the guidance of healthcare professionals where appropriate and we saw evidence of staff working alongside healthcare professionals to achieve best outcomes for people.

Staff encouraged people to be involved and feel included in their environment. People were offered varied activities and participated in social activities of their choice. Staff knew people and their support needs well, they treated people with kindness, compassion and respect. Staff took time to speak with the people they were supporting. People were offered a choice of nutritious meals,

Inspection carried out on 27 June 2016

During a routine inspection

We undertook an unannounced inspection of this service on 26 and 27 June 2016. Cornerways Residential Home provides accommodation and personal care for up to older 20 people. There were 20 people living at the service at the time of our inspection. The home is arranged over three floors, each person had their own bedroom apart from a married couple who shared a room. Access to the first floor is gained by a shaft lift and by a stair lifts to the remaining floor, making all areas of the service accessible to people.

Our previous inspection of Cornerways Residential Home on 16 and 17 June 2015 found breaches of five regulations of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014.

We took enforcement action and required the provider to make improvements. We issued two warning notices, the first in relation to the cleanliness and maintenance of the property and some equipment and the second in relation to systems and processes intended to assess and improve the quality and safety of the service provided. We also asked the provider to take action to ensure all risks were, as far as reasonably practicable, mitigated and to ensure that medicines were safely administered and care and treatment provided in a safe way; to ensure there were sufficient numbers of staff on duty and that care and treatment of service users was appropriate, met their needs and reflected their preferences.

At this inspection we found required improvement had been made in some areas. However, we identified other shortfalls where some regulations were not being met. We also made some recommendations for improvement.

Recruitment checks were incomplete because they did not ensure all staff employed were suitable to work at the service.

Systems and processes were not operated effectively to ensure complete records were kept in respect of each person, including a record of care and treatment provided to the person. Records were also not maintained about some fire safety checks.

Medicines were stored appropriately; records and people confirmed they received the right medicines at the right time.

Staff had received training to support the people they cared for and understood about the Mental Capacity Act and how to support people to make decisions.

The service was safe, clean, hygienic and well maintained; appropriate fire safety checks had taken place.

Equipment used at the home was serviced when needed and certified as fit for purpose and safe to use.

People’s health needs were well managed and referrals to outside healthcare professionals were made in a timely way.

People were supported by enthusiastic staff who received regular training and appropriate supervision. There were enough staff to meet people’s needs.

Staff were caring, compassionate and responsive to people’s needs and interactions between staff and people were warm, friendly and respectful. Staff spent time engaging people in communication and activities suitable for their current needs.

People enjoyed their meals, they were supported to eat when needed and risks of choking, malnutrition and dehydration had been adequately assessed and addressed.

People commented positively about the openness of the management structure and were complimentary of the staff.

We found two of breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.

Inspection carried out on 16 and 17 June 2015

During a routine inspection

We undertook an unannounced inspection of this service on 17 and 18 June 2015. This service provides accommodation and personal care for up to older 20 people. There were 19 people living at the home at the time of our inspection. The home is arranged over three floors, most people had their own bedroom although one room was shared by a married couple. Access to the first floor is gained by a lift and by a stair lift, making all areas of the home accessible to people.

This service had a registered manager in post. They were also the registered manager of another home owned by the same provider. They split their time between the two homes, spending mornings at one and afternoons at the other. A registered manager is a person who is registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

We last inspected the home in January 2014. We found the provider was in breach of regulations about the how they assessed and monitored the quality of service they provided. The provider sent us an action plan telling us what improvements they had made. We reviewed this information and completed a desk top review in February 2014 and found the home to be compliant.

The home was not adequately cleaned or suitably maintained; there were areas that were unhygienic and broken tiles that presented a risk of injury. Equipment, intended to support people, had not been checked or certified as fit and safe to use for two years, putting people’s safety at risk. Safety features to prevent the risk of people falling from windows were disconnected and a fire exit was bolted shut. The safety test certificate for the electrical instillation at the home had expired and no processes were in place to safely manage water to safeguard people against the risks of legionella.

Some risk assessments did not identify when people’s condition deteriorated. This did not support early interventions or provide a suitably robust and preventative system so people remained safe and in good health. Reviews of incidents and accidents did not result in action for staff to take to try to prevent people being at risk again.

People told us they received their medicines safely and when they should. However we found shortfalls in some records in recording and storage of some medicines.

Shortage of staff impacted on the quality of care some people received and the arrangement of some activities reflected staff availability, rather than being planned to meet people’s needs. Elements of care planning were not person centred to reflect differences in people’s individual needs.

The quality assurance framework was not effective to drive the improvement in services people received; many of the highlighted shortfalls had not been identified by audit and monitoring systems in place. Known concerns about staff shortage had not been acted upon and there was no management plan or action to address other known concerns.

Some records at the home were contradictory about the support people needed and some support plans did not contain the level of detail needed in order to ensure staff supported people consistently. Accurate records about people’s support were not always completed and maintained.

Most risks associated with people’s care and support were assessed and people were encouraged to be involved in planning their care. People told us staff acted with their consent and felt that they were treated respectfully and that their privacy and dignity were promoted.

People were able to choose their food at each meal time, snacks and drinks were always available. The food was home-cooked, including some homemade cakes, biscuits and desserts. People enjoyed their meals, describing them as “Very good” and “Marvellous”.

Staff understood how to protect people from the risk of abuse and the action they needed to take to alert managers or authorities if they suspected abuse to ensure people were safe.

Robust recruitment processes were in place. New staff underwent a current induction programme and there was a continuous staff training programme for all staff. Most care staff had completed formal qualifications in health and social care or were in the process of studying for these.

Staff were clear about the aims of the home and worked towards its vision and values. They recognised their own roles as important in the whole staff team and there was good team work throughout the inspection.

Staff showed respect and valued one another as well as people. Staff dedicated some of their own free time to support people with activities because they felt there were not enough staff employed to enhance people’s quality of life. The home benefitted from the support of some voluntary workers.

We found a number of breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.

During a check to make sure that the improvements required had been made

At our inspection on the 8 January 2014 we found that the systems in place to regularly monitor the health and safety of the service were not always used effectively. The service fire risk assessment had not been reviewed in 2013, in line with Fire and Rescue Service requirements, taking into consideration a change to one person�s fire door to their bedroom. The provider wrote to us and told us that they would undertake a number of actions to address these matters by the 6 February 2014. At this inspection we found that the outstanding matters had been addressed.

Inspection carried out on 8 January 2014

During a routine inspection

People living at the service told us they were happy living there. Their comments included �I love it. Everybody is so happy and they get you anything you want�. Another person told us �It�s always good. There is somebody there if you need them�. We spoke with a relative who told us �They look after my [relative]. It is very nice, pleasant and people are nice�.

We saw that the provider had systems in place to obtain consent from people in relation to people's care and support.

People received care that met their needs and promoted their rights. Advice and guidance was sought from health and social care professionals to be able to meet people's needs effectively and promote their welfare and safety.

The service was suitably designed for the needs of the people who lived there. It was clean, homely and well maintained.

There were enough staff on duty to be able to meet people's needs effectively. People we spoke with told us that the staff responded quickly when they were called. There were systems in place to ensure staff were suitably skilled to be able to undertake their role safely and effectively.

The systems in place to regularly monitor the health and safety of the service were not always used effectively. The service fire risk assessment had not been reviewed in 2013, in line with Fire and Rescue Service requirements, taking into consideration a change to one person�s fire door to their bedroom.

Inspection carried out on 25 March 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with people living at Cornerways who told us �I�ve felt so much better since I�ve lived here, this is the right place for me�, �this is a great place to live, the staff are angels; nothing is too much trouble.� A relative told us that the quality of care received was �very good� and that �the staff have always been attentive and got mum help when she�s needed it from the GP and nurses�.

In our discussions with staff they demonstrated a thorough knowledge of the people living at the service. This was confirmed by our observations and in discussion with people.

Care records showed that people had been supported and encouraged to make decisions about their care and planning what went on in the home. We saw that people and their relatives were involved in planning and decision making. When people�s needs changed, we found that records had been updated to reflect this.

Staff spoken with demonstrated good understanding of how to safeguard people from harm. Training records showed that staff received regular training to update their knowledge on abuse and safeguarding. Training records also showed that staff were suitably trained and supported in their role. This included training specific to the people living in the service for example, diabetes care and medication management.

Records showed the provider regularly assessed and monitored the quality of the service. We saw that people and their representatives were asked their views about the home in surveys.

Inspection carried out on 29 December 2011

During a routine inspection

People told us they were happy at the home and felt cared for, listened to and supported.

They said the staff were kind and easy to talk to. People said they were given choices

about what to do, and were involved in planning their care. They said they felt their

opinions were always taken into account. One person told us �they have given me my life back. The staff are so supportive and caring�.

People told us Cornerways was a very happy place to live: �if you hear anything, it�s just laughter. Such a happy atmosphere here�.