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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 23 January 2019

This inspection took place on 20 and 21 November 2018 and was unannounced.

Immacolata House provides accommodation for up to 49 people who require nursing and personal care. The home provides most of its care to people living with dementia. At the time of the inspection there were 49 people living in the home.

Immacolata House is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

At our last inspection we rated the service good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Why the service is rated Good.

There were processes and practices in place to keep people safe. The provider had a robust recruitment programme which meant all new staff were checked to ensure they were suitable to work with vulnerable people. All staff had received training in safeguarding vulnerable people. All staff spoken to were able to tell us what they would look for and how they would report anything they thought put people at risk of harm or abuse.

People received effective care and support from staff who had the skills and knowledge to meet their needs. All staff attended regular updates of the organisations mandatory training.

People who were able told us, and we saw, they were cared for by kind and caring staff. Staff respected people’s privacy and dignity at all times. Relatives told us they were involved in developing and agreeing care plans. They confirmed they were kept informed of any changes and that the staff in the home communicated well with them.

People received responsive care and support which was personalised to their individual needs and wishes. There was clear guidance for staff on how to support people and how to know when a person was not happy or distressed. This was important because not all people were able to verbally communicate. People were supported to access health care services and see healthcare professionals when necessary.

People took part in a range of meaningful activities which included in-house entertainment, trips out and walks in the grounds which had a small holding where people could help care for the animals. A local preschool nursery visited each week and people were engaged in watching or taking part in the children’s activities.

People were supported by a team that was well led. Everybody spoken to said they thought the service was well led.

There were systems in place to monitor the quality of the service, ensure staff kept up to date with good practice and to seek people’s views. Records showed the service responded to concerns and complaints and learnt from the issues raised.

Further information is in the detailed findings below.

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 23 January 2019

The service remains Good.

Effective

Good

Updated 23 January 2019

The service remains Good.

Caring

Good

Updated 23 January 2019

The service remains Good.

Responsive

Good

Updated 23 January 2019

The service remains Good.

Well-led

Good

Updated 23 January 2019

The service remains Good.