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Inspection Summary


Overall summary & rating

Good

Updated 25 January 2017

The inspection took place on the 15 and 16 December 2016.

Westbrooke Grange is a service for five people who have Autism and Learning Disabilities. The service was previously registered as a hospital, but registered as a residential service in 2013. The service does not currently provide nursing care. Any nursing or health services needed by people would be accessed via the local GP and community health services.

A registered manager was based at the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People living at Westbrooke Grange had complex needs associated with their mental health and learning disability. All of the people in the home at the time of the inspection had in the past experienced living in a hospital setting where their choices and lifestyle had been significantly restricted. What was particularly evident at Westbrooke Grange at the time of the inspection was how much people were being supported to make choices and to experience a lifestyle not restricted and dictated by their behaviours and past experiences. People had the support they needed to express their views and wishes and when possible make decisions and choices about their care and lifestyle. People were trying new experiences, going on holiday, spending time with family and going out into the community.

Relatives and other agencies involved with the service said how impressed they were with the progress people had made. They said the registered manager was very good at supporting people with complex needs in a calm and sensible way, which had resulted in an improved quality of life for those concerned.

There was a positive culture in the service, the management team provided strong leadership and led by example. The registered manager had clear visions, values and enthusiasm about how they wished the service to be run and had worked hard to embed this culture within the service. Individualised care was central to the home’s philosophy and staff demonstrated they understood and practiced this by talking to us about how they met people’s support needs. They spoke with commitment and used words like “individual” and “personalised” when they talked about people they supported.

Staff were motivated and inspired to offer kind and compassionate care and support. All the staff said they enjoyed their work and loved seeing people progress. We saw a number of examples of progress people had made since moving into the home. We saw how personalised care and a positive approach to managing behaviour had resulted in people having increased opportunities and enhanced well-being. One person who had previously been restricted within a hospital setting had attended a dance festival and had enjoyed spending time at Christmas with their family. Another person who suffered from episodes of severe anxiety had been supported to go out without support from staff, which had a positive effect on their well-being and self-esteem. Relatives said, “The staff have been really good at striking a balance between supporting people and allowing them their independence”.

People were supported to express their views and have their voice heard. Staff were creative in thinking of ways of helping people express their views and understand what was happening around them. One person who became very anxious when they were planning activities or trips out was supported to complete a book about their feelings and a story board before each activity to help ensure they had clear information and a time line about what was happening. The aim of this was to help ensure events were predicted and surprises were kept to a minimum. This approach had worked well and they had been gone out more in th

Inspection areas

Safe

Good

Updated 25 January 2017

The service was safe.

People were protected by staff who understood how to recognise and report signs of abuse or poor practice.

There were sufficient numbers of staff to meet people’s needs and keep them safe.

The service managed risk appropriately and recognised people’s rights to have choice and control over their lifestyle.

People were protected by safe and appropriate systems for handling and administering medicines.

People were protected by safe and robust recruitment practices.

Effective

Good

Updated 25 January 2017

The service was effective.

People were supported by highly motivated and well trained staff. Induction processes for new staff were thorough and all staff received regular and effective supervision and support.

People’s rights were managed appropriately and their best interests were promoted in line with the Mental Capacity Act 2005.

People’s behaviours were understood and managed safely and lawfully.

People were supported to have their health and dietary need met.

Caring

Good

Updated 25 January 2017

The service was responsive.

People were supported by staff who knew them really well and who were passionate about enhancing people’s well-being and quality of life.

The service was very flexible and responsive to people’s individual needs and preferences. This approach had resulted in very positive outcomes for people, which were recognised and celebrated by staff, relatives and other agencies.

People were supported to lead a full and active lifestyle. People were actively encouraged to engage with the local community and maintain relationships which were important to them.

Complaints and concerns were listened to, taken seriously and used to drive improvement across the service.

Responsive

Good

Updated 25 January 2017

The service was responsive.

People were supported by staff who knew them really well and who were passionate about enhancing people’s well-being and quality of life.

The service was very flexible and responsive to people’s individual needs and preferences. This approach had resulted in very positive outcomes for people, which were recognised and celebrated by staff, relatives and other agencies.

People were supported to lead a full and active lifestyle. People were actively encouraged to engage with the local community and maintain relationships which were important to them.

Complaints and concerns were listened to, taken seriously and used to drive improvement across the service.

Well-led

Good

Updated 25 January 2017

The service was well-led.

There was a positive culture in the service. There were clear values and vision for the service, which included involvement, compassion, dignity, respect and independence. The management team provided strong leadership and led by example.

There was a strong emphasis on continually striving to improve and develop the service.

People where possible were included in decisions about the running of the service and staff were encouraged and supported to question practice.

Robust systems were in place to assess and monitor the quality of the service. The quality assurance system operated to help develop and drive improvement.