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Archived: The Hollies Good

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Reports


Inspection carried out on 11 August 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 11 August 2015 and was unannounced. At our last inspection in April 2015 the service was not meeting the standard in relation to the safe management of medicines. At this inspection we found that the service was now meeting this standard.

The Hollies is a care home for older adults. The maximum number of people they can accommodate is 19. On the day of the inspection there were 19 people residing at the home.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe at the home and safe with the staff who supported them. They told us that staff were patient, kind and respectful. They said they were satisfied with the numbers of staff and that they didn’t have to wait too long for assistance.

People were positive about the staff and staff had the knowledge and skills necessary to support them properly. People told us that the service was responsive to their needs and preferences.

The registered manager and staff at the home had identified and highlighted potential risks to people’s safety and had thought about and recorded how these risks could be reduced.

Staff understood the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and told us they would presume a person could make their own decisions about their care and treatment in the first instance. Staff told us it was not right to make choices for people when they could make choices for themselves.

Food looked and smelt appetising and staff were aware of any special diets people required either as a result of a clinical need or a cultural preference.

There were systems in place to ensure medicines were handled and stored securely and administered to people safely and appropriately.

People had good access to healthcare professionals such as doctors, dentists, chiropodists and opticians and any changes to people’s needs were responded to appropriately and quickly.

People told us staff listened to them and respected their choices and decisions.

People using the service and staff were positive about the registered manager. They confirmed that they were asked about the quality of the service and had made comments about this.

People felt the management took their views into account in order to improve service delivery.

Inspection carried out on 8 April 2015

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

After our inspection of 16 and 17 April 2014 the provider wrote to us to say what they would do to meet legal requirements for the breaches we found. We undertook this unannounced focused inspection to check that the breaches of legal requirements had been addressed.

These breaches related to the safe management of medicines and the appropriate and effective assessment of risk to people’s safety.

We undertook this focused inspection on 8 April 2015 to check that they had followed their plan and to confirm that they now met legal requirements. This report only covers our findings in relation to those requirements. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection, by selecting the 'all reports' link for The Hollies on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

The Hollies provides care and support for up to 19 older people some of whom have dementia.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At this inspection we found that the provider had addressed one of these breaches of legal requirements. However, we found a continued breach in relation to the safe management of medicines.

We found that people were not always getting the medicines they needed and staff were sometimes making mistakes when recording the administration of medicines.

The registered manager and provider had set up a system for checking the medicine records for everyone at the home however; this audit had not identified some errors that had been made.

The staff at the home, who had been given responsibility to administer medicines, did not have up to date training in the safe management of medicines.

This was in breach of Regulation 13 (1)(2) of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2010, which corresponds to regulation 12 (1)(2) of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014.

Risk assessments had been completed for all people who used wheelchairs, and footplates were being used for most people. Where a person did not want to have footplates attached to their wheelchair the risks and benefits had been discussed with them and this had been recorded and was being regularly reviewed.

Inspection carried out on 8 April 2015

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

After our inspection of 16 and 17 April 2014 the provider wrote to us to say what they would do to meet legal requirements for the breaches we found. We undertook this unannounced focused inspection to check that the breaches of legal requirements had been addressed.

These breaches related to the safe management of medicines and the appropriate and effective assessment of risk to people’s safety.

We undertook this focused inspection on 8 April 2015 to check that they had followed their plan and to confirm that they now met legal requirements. This report only covers our findings in relation to those requirements. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection, by selecting the 'all reports' link for The Hollies on our website at www.cqc.org.uk.

The Hollies provides care and support for up to 19 older people some of whom have dementia.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At this inspection we found that the provider had addressed one of these breaches of legal requirements. However, we found a continued breach in relation to the safe management of medicines.

We found that people were not always getting the medicines they needed and staff were sometimes making mistakes when recording the administration of medicines.

The registered manager and provider had set up a system for checking the medicine records for everyone at the home however; this audit had not identified some errors that had been made.

The staff at the home, who had been given responsibility to administer medicines, did not have up to date training in the safe management of medicines.

This was in breach of Regulation 13 (1)(2) of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2010, which corresponds to regulation 12 (1)(2) of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014.

Risk assessments had been completed for all people who used wheelchairs, and footplates were being used for most people. Where a person did not want to have footplates attached to their wheelchair the risks and benefits had been discussed with them and this had been recorded and was being regularly reviewed.

Inspection carried out on 16-17 April 2014

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 11 August 2015 and was unannounced. At our last inspection in April 2015 the service was not meeting the standard in relation to the safe management of medicines. At this inspection we found that the service was now meeting this standard.

The Hollies is a care home for older adults. The maximum number of people they can accommodate is 19. On the day of the inspection there were 19 people residing at the home.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe at the home and safe with the staff who supported them. They told us that staff were patient, kind and respectful. They said they were satisfied with the numbers of staff and that they didn’t have to wait too long for assistance.

People were positive about the staff and staff had the knowledge and skills necessary to support them properly. People told us that the service was responsive to their needs and preferences.

The registered manager and staff at the home had identified and highlighted potential risks to people’s safety and had thought about and recorded how these risks could be reduced.

Staff understood the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and told us they would presume a person could make their own decisions about their care and treatment in the first instance. Staff told us it was not right to make choices for people when they could make choices for themselves.

Food looked and smelt appetising and staff were aware of any special diets people required either as a result of a clinical need or a cultural preference.

There were systems in place to ensure medicines were handled and stored securely and administered to people safely and appropriately.

People had good access to healthcare professionals such as doctors, dentists, chiropodists and opticians and any changes to people’s needs were responded to appropriately and quickly.

People told us staff listened to them and respected their choices and decisions.

People using the service and staff were positive about the registered manager. They confirmed that they were asked about the quality of the service and had made comments about this.

People felt the management took their views into account in order to improve service delivery.

Inspection carried out on 2 July 2013

During a routine inspection

People who use the service were very positive about the care and treatment they received from staff at the home. They confirmed that staff assisted them when they needed support with their care and that staff were very helpful. One person commented, “it couldn’t be better.” A relative we spoke with told us “the care is excellent.” Another relative said “they do their best.”

People we spoke with confirmed that staff communicated well with them and asked for their permission before any care or treatment took place. One person commented “they always ask.” People told us they were satisfied with the support they received to take their medication. They told us that staff explained what the medication they were taking was for if they didn’t already know. One person told us “the manager tells you what it’s for.” People also told us they had good access to health care professionals such as doctors, dentists and chiropodists.

People told us they had no complaints about the service but knew how to make a complaint if they needed to. They said they were confident that the manager would take any complaint seriously.

We saw that records in relation to the care and treatment of people using the service were up to date, being stored securely and were accessible to staff and people using the service when needed.

Inspection carried out on 22 March 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with eight people who use the service and five visitors. People praised the service and the care provided. Comments included, “it is a very sought after place, it has got a good reputation, and its friendly” and “I’m happy here, there’s no changes needed.”

We found there were systems in place to enable people to experience care and support that met their needs. People said that they were happy with the care they received. Comments included, “she’s well looked after.” We found there was enough equipment to promote the independence and comfort of people who use the service.

Everybody spoke positively about the staff team. Comments included, “they’re all very nice to me” and “staff will get you anything.” We saw that staff worked as a team and attended to people in an unhurried and pleasant manner. We found there were effective recruitment and selection processes in place.

We found there were systems to assess and monitor the quality of service that people received. People told us the management team ensured that any concerns they had with the service were dealt with. “They’ve always got time to talk to you,” a relative said.

However, we found that an accurate record in respect of each person who uses the service, including up-to-date care plans, risk assessments and weight records, were not always maintained. This may have failed to protect people against the risks of unsafe or inappropriate care.

Inspection carried out on 24 January 2012

During a routine inspection

People who use the service told us that staff were kind and respected their privacy. They also confirmed that they were able to make decisions about their care and that staff respected their wishes and care preferences.

People who use the service confirmed that they had good access to the local community including places of worship as well as local pubs and restaurants.

People said they felt supported by the staff team and that they were included in decisions about their care as far as possible. They told us that they had been asked about their care needs and, where possible, they had visited the home before making a decision to move in.

A number of people told us that the home had been recommended to them.

People told us they were satisfied with the activities available at the home and that they could go out if they wished to.

We observed people being appropriately supported by staff at the home. People told us they enjoyed the food at the home and there was always enough to eat.

Staff we spoke with had a good understanding of the needs of the people they supported.

People who use the service indicated to us that they felt safe with the staff at the home. They told us that if they had concerns about their care they would speak with a relative or the manager.

People told us they had confidence in how the staff supported them and people we spoke to said they felt safe with the staff when they were providing care.

People also said the management and staff were approachable and friendly.

We observed staff being appropriately supported by the management so that they could provide for the care needs of the people who use the service.

People were positive about the quality of care and confirmed that the staff usually asked them how things were going and if they were happy with the care provided at The Hollies.

People told us that the management of the service ensured that any issues or problems they had with the service were dealt with swiftly and appropriately.

Although the provider was carrying out health and safety checks at the home these were not always being appropriately recorded.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)