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Lister House Nursing Home Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 15 January 2019

During a routine inspection

About the service:

Lister House Nursing Home is a 31 bedded service providing nursing or personal care to older people, people living with dementia and people with physical disabilities. At the time of our visit there were 26 people using the service.

People’s experience of using this service:

We found no breaches of regulations at the inspection in January 2018 but identified some improvements needed to be made in relation to medicines management and quality assurance systems needed to be embedded and tested over time. On this inspection we found improvements had been made.

Staff were caring. People we spoke with were complimentary about the service and said they would recommend the home. There was a culture within the service of treating people with dignity, respect and compassion.

Activities were on offer to keep people occupied both on a group and individual basis.

Medicines were being administered safely and people’s dietary and healthcare needs were met.

Staff were recruited safely and there were enough of them to keep people safe and to meet their care needs. Staff were receiving appropriate training which was good and relevant to their role. Staff were supported by the manager and were receiving formal supervision where they could discuss their on-going development needs.

Care plans were up to date and detailed the care and support people wanted and needed. Risk assessments were in place and showed what action had been taken to mitigate any risks which had been identified. Appropriate referrals were being made to the safeguarding team when this had been necessary.

There was a complaints procedure available which enabled people to raise any concerns or complaints about the care or support they received.

The manager, who was in the early stages of registering with CQC, provided staff with leadership and was described as being very approachable. Audits and checks were carried out and used to drive continuous improvements to the service people received.

People’s feedback was used to make changes to the service.

Quality audits had been maintained, but we identified some additional areas which needed to be included as part of these audits.

More information in Detailed Findings below:

Rating at last inspection:

Requires improvement (report published 9 February 2018).

Why we inspected:

This was a planned inspection based on the rating at the last inspection. We found improvements had been made since our last inspection and the service has met the characteristics of Good in four areas and requires Improvement in Well- Led.

Follow up:

We will continue to monitor intelligence we receive about the service until we return to visit as per our re-inspection programme. If any concerning information is received we may inspect sooner.

Inspection carried out on 4 January 2018

During a routine inspection

The inspection was carried out on 4 January 2018 and was unannounced. This meant the registered provider and staff did not know we would be visiting. The service was previously inspected in May 2017, where concerns were identified in relation to poor moving and handling practice, a lack of appropriate risk assessments, staff under pressure as people had to wait long periods for their meals, staff understanding of mental capacity was vague and there was a lack regular supervision. We also found, people's privacy and dignity was not always respected, consent was not sought consistently, people had limited access to activities, and some information in care records was contradictory, there was a lack of clear leadership and audits were not significantly robust. We took enforcement action against the provider and told them that they had to make improvements to the service. We also placed the service into special measures. Services in special measures will be kept under review and, if we have not taken immediate action to propose to cancel the registered provider's registration of the service, will be inspected again within six months.

This service has been in Special Measures. Services that are in Special Measures are kept under review and inspected again within six months. We expect services to make significant improvements within this timeframe. During this inspection the service demonstrated to us that improvements have been made and is no longer rated as inadequate overall or in any of the key questions. Therefore, this service is now out of Special Measures.

The home had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are 'registered persons'. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Lister House Nursing Home is a 31 bed nursing home in the Heaton area of Bradford, providing nursing and personal care to older adults with a range of support and care needs. At the time of the inspection there were 21 people living at the home. The home provided accommodation over two floors with lift access.

The provider had safeguarding procedures and staff were aware of the procedures. Staff had received training and people were protected from abuse. Potential risks to people's health had been identified and assessed. The provider had effective recruitment processes in place and there was sufficient staff to support people safely. People received the medicines they needed and as prescribed although we found some minor recording errors on medication administration records (MAR). The environment was well maintained, clean and free from odour.

Assessments identified risks to people and management plans to reduce the risks were in place to ensure people's safety. Staff had the training and support they needed to care for people using the service. Staff understood their roles and responsibilities in relation to the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). Staff would gain people's consent before they provided any care or support to them. The meals provided were well presented, nutritious, appetising and respectful of people’s wishes, needs and preferences.

People were treated with kindness and supported by caring and respectful staff who knew them well. Their privacy and dignity was upheld and they were supported to maintain their independence. People received personalised care and had opportunities to take part in a variety of suitable activities.

The provider assessed people's care and support needs and developed person-centred, detailed plans of care for staff to follow. Although care plans were regularly reviewed, there was a lack of evidence people and/or their relatives were involved in regular care plan review. The registered manager said they were working wi

Inspection carried out on 22 May 2017

During a routine inspection

The inspection of Lister House Nursing Home took place over two days, 22 and 23 May 2017. Both days were unannounced. At our last inspection in March 2016, we rated the home as requires improvement. . There was one breach of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014 for good governance. On this inspection we looked to see if improvements had been made.

Lister House Nursing Home provides accommodation and nursing care for up to 31 people. On the days we inspected there were 31 people in the home, one of whom was receiving respite care.

There was a registered manager in post and they were available on the second day of the inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe and we saw evidence of appropriate interventions when safeguarding concerns were raised. However, we found risks were poorly managed with a lack of suitable assessments, unclear and contradictory instruction for staff and limited personalised assessments. This was especially in regards to moving and handling as we observed numerous poor procedures with staff lacking confidence in their knowledge and judgements. Specific equipment had not been provided for individuals where required.

Staffing levels were not always appropriate for people’s level of need. Some people required one to one support which staff were not always able to give and many people remained in their rooms. It was not clear if this was their choice as there were no records to indicate this.

Medication was administered, stored and recorded appropriately.

Staff’s knowledge of person-centred care appeared lacking and they did not appreciate the significance of a Deprivation of Liberty Safeguard (DoLS). Mental capacity assessments were in place for most people unable to make decisions but these were not evident for every decision. People were not always supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff did not always support them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the service did not always support this practice.

People were supported to eat and drink and we saw appropriate records kept of their intake. However, due to the staff pressures and the number of people requiring assistance people had to wait for some time before receiving their meals.

External health and social care support was accessed as needed.

We observed staff interactions to be mixed. Some staff were very caring and attentive but others displayed brusqueness and irritation at times. We saw some people were ignored and staff did not actively engage with people.

Privacy and dignity was not always respected as some people had to wait for support to access the toilet and their needs were not kept confidential as staff shouted to each other requesting assistance.

Care records were mostly person-centred but did not always reflect people’s current needs and were complex to navigate. One care worker admitted to not reading them which meant care tasks could be missed.

Activities were arranged but not everyone engaged in them and there was little evidence of one-to-one interaction, especially for people in their rooms.

Complaints were handled promptly and effectively with apologies given where required.

Although some people expressed their satisfaction at living in the home, we found the atmosphere strained and tense at times, as staff struggled to meet people’s needs. There was limited evidence of senior leadership.

There was limited evidence of quality assurance which focused on individual concerns rather than overall practice issues. We found breaches of regulations in relation to dignity and respect, safe care and t

Inspection carried out on 30 March 2016

During a routine inspection

Lister House Nursing Home provides accommodation and nursing care to up to 32 people at any one time. The home is located in Heaton, Bradford with accommodation spread over two floors. The client group is mostly older people, some of whom live with dementia. There are also some younger adults with physical disabilities.

This was an unannounced inspection which took place on 30 and 31 March 2016. On the date of the inspection there were 29 people living in the home. As part of this inspection we checked whether action had been taken to address breaches in regulation we identified during the last inspection on 7 and 8 September 2015.

A registered manager was in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the last inspection in September 2015 we identified three breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) 2014 regulations in relation to staffing, management of risks and record keeping.

At this inspection we found improvements had been made to staffing levels, to help ensure safe care and treatment. Staff told us the increase had been positive and made for a more pleasant experience within the home.

We found improvements had been made to care records with better populated care plans and more robust evidence care was delivered in line with plans of care. However further improvements were required to documentation surrounding medicine management. We identified this was of minor risk and the registered manager assured us it would be addressed.

Following the last inspection, the home had utilised assistive technology to reduce the frequency and impact of falls within the home. We saw evidence this was being utilised and had been effective in reducing the frequency of falls. However documentation following incidents was not always appropriately completed and did not demonstrate a fully robust falls prevention strategy.

Medicines were safely managed. People received their medicines in a timely manner. Medicines were stored appropriately within the home.

People told us they felt safe within the home. Staff demonstrated they understood safeguarding procedures. We saw evidence these had been utilised to help keep people safe.

Safe recruitment procedures were in place to ensure staff were of suitable character to care for vulnerable people.

People had access to a good choice of food. Staff understood how to meet people’s individual nutritional needs .

The service was acting with the legal frameworks of the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS).

People and relatives generally told us staff were kind and caring and treated them well. We observed care and support and saw staff knew people well and interacted with them in a positive manner.

People’s individual needs were assessed and clear plans of place put in place for staff to follow. We saw examples of staff following plans of care to help ensure appropriate care.

Systems were in place to assess, monitor and improve the service. We saw the manager undertook frequent audits and checks of the computerised care system and took action where records provided insufficient evidence that people were receiving the required care and support.

Mechanisms were in place to listen to people’s views and use these views to make changes to care and support provision.

We found a breach of one regulation of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) 2014 Regulations. You can see what action we asked the provider to take at the back of this report.

Inspection carried out on 7 and 8 September 2015

During a routine inspection

Lister House Nursing Home provides accommodation and nursing care to up to 32 people at any one time. The home is located in Heaton, Bradford with accommodation spread over two floors. The client group is mostly older people, some of whom live with dementia. There are also some younger adults with physical disabilities.

This was an unannounced inspection which took place on 7 and 8 September 2015. On the date of the inspection there were 31 people living in the home. As part of this inspection we checked whether action had been taken to address breaches in regulation we identified during the last inspection on 20 January 2015.

A registered manager was in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People told us they felt safe and secure in the home and did not raise any concerns over their safety. Staff understood how to identify and act on any concerns.

Following the previous inspection in January 2015, we found improvements had been made to the way medicines were managed. People received their medicines at the times they needed them and in a safe way.

Risks to people’s health and safety was not always appropriate mitigated by the home. Appropriate falls prevention methods were not deployed by the home, putting people at risk of continued falls.

Safe recruitment procedures were in place to help ensure staff were of suitable character to work with vulnerable people.

At the last inspection in January 2015, we found staffing levels were not adequate to ensure safe care. At this inspection we found staffing levels had been increased. However, based on the needs of the people living in the home, they were still not adequate to ensure consistently safe care. Dependency assessments for some people had been calculated incorrectly.

Following the last inspection, improvements had been made to the training management system. Staff received a range of suitable training in ensure they had the correct skills and knowledge for their role.

People reported the food in the home was good and said there was sufficient choice. We found people were provided with sufficiently quantities of suitably nutritious food and appropriate hydration. Nutritional risks to people were well managed.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) monitors the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) which applies to care homes. Although the home’s environment focussed on ensuring the least restrictive options, for example in free movement around and outside the home, the manager had not undertaken sufficient assessment of the restrictions placed on each individual to determine whether any DoLS applications were required.

People said that staff were kind and caring and treated them well. This was confirmed by our observations of care and support where staff showed a compassionate and caring attitude towards the people they supported. Staff knew the people they were caring for, for example their likes and preferences

A system was in place to ensure people knew how to complain and to ensure any complaints were dealt with appropriately.

Since the last inspection, staff had transferred information onto a computerised care record system. However, we found this was not fully populated, with some information missing for example, about people’s capacity and life histories. Due to lack of appropriate records we were unable to confirm whether people had received appropriate personal care in line with their plans of care.

Since the last inspection in January 2015, the manager had made improvements to the quality assurance system and robust checks in areas such as nutrition, weight management and pressure relieving mattresses were carried out. However, improvements were needed to some such as care plans and staffing levels checks to ensure they were sufficiently robust to pro-actively identify and rectify risks.

Systems were in place to seek people’s feedback on the quality of the service and involve them in decisions relating to the running of the service.

We found three breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we asked the provider to take at the back of this report.

Inspection carried out on 20 January 2015

During a routine inspection

ister House Nursing Home provides accommodation and nursing care to up to 32 people at any one time. The home is located in Heaton, Bradford with accommodation spread over two floors. The client group includes a mixture of older people living with dementia, and people of a range of ages with physical disabilities. On the date of the inspection there were 28 people living in the home.

A registered manager was not in place with the previous manager deregistering in November 2014. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. A new manager had been recruited and told us it was their intention to apply for the registered managers position.

Medicines were not always safely managed. Systems were in place to ensure medicines including controlled drugs were stored safely and appropriately. However we found examples of people not receiving their medicines as prescribed which put them at risk of harm. The administration of medicines was not always robustly documented.

People told us they felt safe in the home and we found staff had a good understanding of how to identify and report risks to people’s safety. Risk assessments were in place for each person which detailed how to protect people from harm.

Staffing levels were not sufficient to protect people from harm. We found communal areas were not adequately supervised and people experienced delays in getting up in the mornings. The lunchtime experience was also delayed and some people had to wait unacceptable amounts of time for their meal as a result of low staffing levels.

People reported the food in the home was good and said there was sufficient choice. They told us that the chef was adaptable in that if they didn’t like the choices on offer they would be offered something else.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) monitors the operation of the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) which applies to care homes. We did not see any restrictions on people’s liberty which could constitute a deprivation of their liberty. Discussions with the manager and staff demonstrated a good understanding of the legal framework in which the home had to operate. This gave us assurances that the manager and staff knew how to act within the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) to ensure people’s rights were protected.

People’s needs were regularly assessed but people did not always receive care in line with their assessed needs. Nutritional supplements and fluid thickeners were not always added to food and drink putting people at risk of harm. Another person’s mattress was not on the correct setting which meant they were not receiving appropriate pressure relief.

People and their relatives told us staff were kind and caring and treated them well. We observed care and support and saw staff knew the people they cared for, spoke politely to them and showed a high level of respect. We saw examples of individualised care and support provided to people’s preferences.

A complaints system was in place and the people we spoke with had confidence any concerns and complaints would be appropriately dealt with. People spoke positively about the service, demonstrating a high level of satisfaction with the service.

The new manager had plans in place to ensure a robust programme of quality assurance was put in place, however this had not yet been fully implemented on the date of our inspection. We found

a number of concerns with the medication management system, care quality, and staffing which should have been identified and rectified through an effective system of quality assurance.

We identified five breaches of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2010. You can see what action we asked the provider to take at the back of the report.

Inspection carried out on 12 June 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with five people who used the service. They were all satisfied with the standard of care provided. One person told us �It�s a good home, but there is not enough for me to do.� Another person told us �I am comfortable here, staff are excellent, they come to my assistance quickly and are always helpful.�

We spoke with a visiting health professional who told us �It is a very good home, I would recommend it for nursing care. People come here with pressure sores and they always improve, the pressure area care is very good. The nurses are clinically very good, staff are sensible and refer people appropriately. I have never seen anything in the home which makes me uncomfortable.�

We found interactions between staff and people who used the service were generally positive and staff treated people with dignity and respect.

We found care records were adequate. This supported the provider and staff to deliver safe and appropriate care to people who used the service.

Inspection carried out on 15 January 2013

During an inspection in response to concerns

During this inspection we found people�s dignity and independence were not respected or supported. Although the people who were able to talk with us spoke highly of the staff and the meals in particular, we saw in some cases those people less able to voice their opinion were not provided with respect.

We also found that although the care plans were detailed, the care people who used the service received did not always correspond with the care plan.

We also found the provider lacking in infection control areas particularly in the laundry and general cleanliness.

Staffing was found to be at an appropriate level.

Inspection carried out on 26 September 2012

During a routine inspection

People experienced care, treatment and support that met their needs and protected their rights. We spoke with two members of staff who told us they thought the care was very good and they had a very good team. People�s views and experiences were taken into account in the way the service was provided and delivered in relation to their care.

During our inspection we spoke with three people using the service and they told us they were very happy with the care they received at Lister House. One person using the service told us "I would give them 100% for cleanliness, 100% for the food and 100% for the care." and another said "They really look after me here."

Appropriate arrangements were in place in relation to obtaining medicine, recording of medicine and medicines were prescribed and given to people appropriately. There were enough qualified, skilled and experienced staff to meet people�s needs and there was an effective complaints system available. Comments and complaints people made were responded to appropriately.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)