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Inspection carried out on 23 August 2017

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 23 and 24 August 2017 and was unannounced. Grasmere Nursing Home provides accommodation, nursing and personal care for up to 21 older people who have a physical disability. At the time of our inspection there were 18 older people living at the home. People had various needs including physical frailty requiring personal care and nursing support with all activities of daily living. Some people were living with dementia. The ambience was warm and inviting. The accommodation is provided over three floors with a mezzanine area on the first floor. Several of the bedrooms have en-suite facilities. All rooms on the first and second floors can be accessed by a passenger lift. The mezzanine area can be accessed by a platform lift and there are stair lifts located on several staircases around the home. The home was clean and tidy and maintained to a high standard and people’s bedrooms had been personalised. There was access to attractive gardens to the front of the building and a small patio to the side for people's use. The nursing home is located in a residential area in close proximity to local shops and Worthing seafront.

There was a registered manager in post who joined us throughout our inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. They had been in post since October 2015.

At the last inspection on 20 July 2016 we identified one breach of Regulations associated with how the staff managed prescribed medicines. We found risk assessments was an area which required improvement as they did not always contain the necessary details and guidance needed to ensure risks to people were mitigated. We also identified care records failed to capture how best interest decisions had been made on behalf of people who lacked capacity to do so for themselves. Following the last inspection, the provider wrote to us to confirm that they had addressed these issues. At this visit, we found actions had been completed and the provider has now met all the legal requirements to ensure the home was safe and effective.

Significant improvements had been made to how medicines were managed. This included how medicines were stored and records of stock levels maintained. Homely remedies were administered to people as recommended and records of when they had been opened and administered were accurate. The registered manager had implemented guidance for ‘when required’ medicines. This included medicines used for pain relief. However, audits to monitor medicine systems were not always effective. This included where this guidance could be developed further. We have referred to this in the Well-led section of this report. In addition, there was a range of other health and safety audit processes to measure the overall quality of the service provided to people and to make improvements when needed.

Since our last inspection the registered manager had developed risk assessments to ensure risks to people’s health and welfare were minimised and consistency in care was provided. There were also detailed personalised mental capacity assessments on behalf of those who were assessed as lacking capacity to make specific decisions. The staff had worked in accordance with current legislation relating to the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and the Deprivation to Liberties Safeguards (DoLS).

People and their relatives told us their family members were safe at the home. Staff were trained in adult safeguarding procedures and knew what to do if they considered people were at risk from harm.

Staff knew people well and kind, caring relationships had been developed. People were treated with dignity and respect. Care plans reflected information relevant to each

Inspection carried out on 20 July 2016

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 20 July 2016 and was unannounced. Grasmere Nursing Home provides accommodation, nursing and personal care for up to 21 older people or people with a physical disability. The service offers long term and respite care. At the time of inspection there were 19 people living at the service. People were mostly older with complex needs or physical frailty requiring personal care and nursing support with all activities of daily living. Accommodation is provided in an older building over three floors with a mezzanine area on the first floor. There are 20 single bedrooms, several of which have en-suite facilities. All rooms on the first and second floors can be accessed by a passenger lift. The mezzanine area can be accessed by a platform lift and there are stair lifts located on several staircases around the home. There are landscaped gardens to the front of the building and a small patio to the side for resident use. The service is located in a residential area, located a short distance from shops, public transport, local amenities and the seafront.

The registered manager had been in post since October 2015 and was present throughout the inspection. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People received their regular medications safely and as prescribed. However, stock balances were not maintained, so any discrepancies could not be identified and homely remedies had not always been recorded, so it was unclear if people had received them or not. Allergies were not recorded accurately on the medication administration record for two people, which meant they were at risk of being prescribed and administered medicines which could cause them harm. There was also a lack of guidance for staff regarding the administration of ‘as required’ medicines, which meant that there was a risk of medicines being given inappropriately. Dates of opening were not always recorded on liquid medications which had a limited shelf life, which meant that people were at risk of receiving out of date medicines. This meant that medicines were not always managed safely and was identified as a breach of the Health and Social care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014.

Individual risks were identified and assessed. However, guidance for staff lacked sufficient detail to manage these risks effectively. For example, one person had difficulty swallowing liquids. A Speech and Language Therapist (SALT) assessment recommended that one scoop of thickening agent per beaker would thicken fluids sufficiently for the person to swallow them safely. However this information was not incorporated into the care plan for this person. Another person was identified as prone to constipation. There was a stool chart in place and they were prescribed ‘as required’ laxatives. However, there was no clear guidance to staff regarding this person’s usual routine or when ‘as required’ medicines should be given. This meant that staff did not have all the information they needed to manage individual risks effectively and was identified as an area of practice that needs improvement.

Staff had received training and understood the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA). There were detailed mental capacity assessments in place and where people lacked mental capacity to make some decisions there was clear guidance to staff regarding which decisions people could make for themselves and which they could not. However, where people were assessed as not having capacity it was not clear how or why decisions had been made on their behalf. This meant that decisions made in people’s best interests were not recorded in line with legal requirements and this was ident

Inspection carried out on 18 September 2014

During a routine inspection

Grasmere Nursing Home is registered to provide nursing or personal care for up to 21 people. At the time of inspection there were 18 people living at the home.

Our inspection was undertaken by an adult social care inspector. During this inspection, we looked at the outcomes relating to respecting and involving people, care and welfare of people, the safeguarding of people, staff training and supervision, the process for assessing and monitoring the quality of service.

Below is a summary of what we found. We spoke with five people who use the service, three relatives, the registered nurse in charge, the cook and four care staff. We looked at four care files, staff personal files, four care plans and a number of relevant records.

We used the information to answer the five questions we always ask;

• Is the service safe?

• Is the service effective?

• Is the service caring?

• Is the service responsive?

• Is the service well-led?

Is the service safe?

We found the service was safe. This was because care plans were comprehensive, reviewed on a regular basis and were up to date. There were individual risk assessments in place that were reviewed frequently and ensured that people who use the service were safe. We found that people’s diversity, values and human rights were respected.

We spoke with five people and three visiting relatives. They told us they were well supported. They said that their members of family were treated as individuals and; their dignity and privacy were maintained. They said that staff ensured their safety and they were able to make informed decision about any likely risk.

We found risk assessments in place to ensure that the environment was safe for people who use the service and staff working there. There was a system in place for staff to report any incidents and learn from concerns raised to ensure the safety of people.

We found staff were properly trained and supervised and had the opportunity to improve their skills. This meant that people at the home received care from a team of competent staff.

The Care Quality Commission is required by law to monitor the operation of Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) and to report on what we find. While no applications had been submitted, appropriate policies and procedures were in place. Relevant staff had been trained to understand when an application should be made, and how to submit one.

Is the service effective?

We found the service was effective. This was because people were provided with clear and adequate information about what services were available to them prior to moving into the home. We found where they were able, people expressed their views and were involved in making decisions about their care and treatment.

We observed staff treating people with respect and dignity. For example they would knock on people’s door and wait to be asked before entering. They would made sure doors were closed when attending to people's personal needs.

We saw in people’s care plans that their capability had been assessed. There was information about the level of support that they required as well as their abilities to lead an independent life. Relatives we spoke with confirmed that their family members were well supported and encouraged to lead an ordinary life as much as possible.

Is the service caring?

We found that the service was caring. We noticed that each person had a personalised care plan that was reviewed on a regular basis. We found that where people’s needs had changed, their care plan had been amended accordingly to reflect the changes. This ensured the care and treatment they received were appropriate to their needs.

People we spoke with and their relatives told us the following: “My wife X has been living here for a number of years and is well looked after”, “X the nurse in charge is very caring and staff are so helpful”, “Dad is well looked after and they understand his needs”, “The home may look a bit tired but cannot fault the care that X my husband had been receiving for the past years”.

We found that people were supported to maintain their dignity and felt free to express their views.

Is the service responsive?

We found that the service was responsive. There was a system in place to deal with concerns and complaints. People we spoke with were aware of the complaints procedure in place. They felt that their views were taken into consideration and acted upon accordingly.

We found that the home offered a range of activities such as arts and crafts, exercises, reminiscence, music and movement, organ playing and celebration of seasonal events. People we spoke with told us they were keen to take part in some of the activities. One person said that I like the exercise routine.

Is the service well-led?

We found that the service was well led. We found that the home had started to carry out resident’s survey about the quality of service they offer. We were told that they were in process of sending out questionnaires to people and their relatives.

We looked at responses from the previous survey where only fifty per cent of people who use the service responded. However we found where there had been queries raised within the survey, the home had responded to them appropriately and action taken to ensure that people’s views were acted upon accordingly.

Relatives we spoke with told us that they were always asked during their visit if they had any comments or concerns. One person said we just talked to the nurse in charge or X the manager and found that matters were dealt there and then.

Staff we spoke with told us that they had very good support from the management, were able to express their views and felt that they were listened to. We found staff were clear about their role, accountability and worked well as a team supporting each other.

Inspection carried out on 18 June 2013

During a routine inspection

We saw that people experienced safe and effective care based on detailed care plans and risk assessments that documented peoples’ preferences and met individual needs. We saw that the administration of medication was undertaken in a safe and controlled manner.

The people we spoke to told us they liked living at the home and that staff were very kind. They told us staff spoke and listened to them in a respectful way, communication was good and that they were well cared for. People told us if they had any concerns or wished to make a complaint they would tell the staff or the manager. One person said “It’s lovely here. They really look after me”.

Visitors we spoke with made us aware they were happy with the care their relatives received. They talked to us about how the staff were “So kind”, that “Nothing is too much trouble for them” and that the manager was very approachable. They told us that they had involvement in their relatives care. One person said they visited almost every day and were always made very welcome. They told us they had no complaints but knew that prompt action would be taken to address any concerns.

Inspection carried out on 6 June 2012

During a routine inspection

The people who live in Grasmere Nursing Home told us they were very happy with the care in the home, that the staff were kind and polite.

One person told us “I can’t speak highly enough of the staff and care here” and another told us “There is always a choice for lunch”.

Inspection carried out on 1 November 2011

During a routine inspection

The people who live in Grasmere Nursing Home told us they were happy living in the home. They said that the staff were generally very kind and “couldn’t do enough for you”.

We spoke to relatives of people staying in the home. They told us that their relative’s healthcare needs were identified and addressed. They told us they had no concerns. The staff were “lovely” and they always were offered a cup of tea or coffee when they visited.