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Inspection carried out on 25 October 2017

During a routine inspection

Arran Manor is registered to provide residential care and support for up to 22 elderly people. At the time of our inspection 20 people were using the service. At the last inspection of this service on 1 October 2014, the service was rated Good. At this inspection we found that the service remained Good.

The home is located in a residential area of Hornchurch in the London Borough of Havering. The provider of the service is an individual who is responsible for the day-to-day management of the service. Therefore, they are not required to have a separate manager that needed to be registered with the CQC.

A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons.’ A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered care homes, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People continued to receive safe care. Staff were appropriately recruited. Sufficient staff were available to provide care and support to meet people’s needs. People were protected from the risk of harm and appropriate risk assessments were in place to provide safe care. People received their prescribed medicines from competent staff who were trained to administer medicines safely.

The care that people received continued to be effective. Staff had access to the support, supervision, training and on going professional development they required to work effectively in their roles. People were supported to maintain good health and nutrition.

People were encouraged and supported to make decisions about their care and welfare. Where people's ability to consent to their care fluctuated, the manager sought appropriate guidance and followed legislation designed to protect people's rights and freedom.

People continued to develop positive relationships with the staff who were caring and treated them with respect. People had personalised care plans that enabled staff to provide consistent care and support in line with their personal preferences. People knew how to raise a concern or make a complaint. The manager had implemented effective systems to manage any complaints that they may receive.

The service continued to have a positive ethos and an open culture. The manager was a visible role model in the home. People and their relatives told us that they had confidence in the manager’s ability to provide high quality managerial oversight and leadership to the home. The manager continued to monitor the quality of the service provided to ensure that people’s needs were being met and that they were supported in a way that they wanted.

Inspection carried out on 01 October 2014

During a routine inspection

Arran Manor is a residential care home that provides personal care and accommodation for up to 22 older people. At the time of our visit there were 17 people living at the home, some of whom were living with dementia. The home is located in a residential area of Hornchurch in the London Borough of Havering. The provider of the service is an individual who is responsible for the day-to-day management of the service. Therefore they are not required to have a separate manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act and associated Regulations about how the service is run. This was an unannounced inspection, carried out on 1 October 2014. We inspected Arran Manor in December 2013 and found that the service was meeting the regulations inspected.

People told us they felt safe at Arran Manor and were protected from abuse. Staff knew how to identify if people were at risk of abuse and knew what to do to ensure they were protected.

The provider had knowledge of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). Staff had also received training in this subject. Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards authorisation gives the provider legal permission to deprive a person of their liberties where it is deemed to be in their best interests or their own safety. Staff were aware that on occasions this was necessary. There were no DoLS authorisations in place at the time of the inspection.

Staff were aware of people’s individual needs. We saw that care was provided with kindness and that they treated people with respect. People and their relatives spoke positively about the home, the staff and the care their family member received. They told us, "The staff are lovely, all warm, caring and respectful.” Staff took time to talk with people and provide activities such as cake baking, scrabble, puzzles and arts and crafts.

Staff were appropriately trained and skilled. They provided care in a safe environment. They understood their roles and responsibilities, as well as the values of the home. Staff supported people to maintain their mobility. People were happy with the quality of the food provided. Their dietary needs were met in a way which promoted and maintained their health and wellbeing.

Staff received the support and training they needed to provide a safe service that met people’s needs.

Relatives knew how to raise concerns and felt the registered manager was approachable and would adequately deal with any issues. Relatives told us they did not have any concerns and felt the manager sought their views and was good at communicating changes.

Inspection carried out on 10 October 2013

During a routine inspection

People and their relatives were very positive about the service. People were asked for their consent before they received care and assistance. One relative said "they keep us informed and seek our permission before they do anything." People who used the service and their families told us they were involved in making decisions around their care and support planning. One person said "I like living here, the staff are kind and the food is nice." A relative told us " I am very confident that she is well looked after here. They are aware of people's health and call the GP whenever they need to."

People's needs were met by staff who were appropriately recruited, qualified, experienced and supported to carry out their role. A member of staff told us " I get the training to do my job well. There is good team working, I can talk to the manager whenever I want." The service had procedures in place for dealing with complaints which were listened to and acted upon by the manager. A relative told us " anything we are not happy with they deal with it straight away.They have encouraged us to go and talk to them. We can go to them anytime."

Inspection carried out on 18 June 2012

During a themed inspection looking at Dignity and Nutrition

People told us what it was like to live at this home and described how they were treated by staff and their involvement in making choices about their care. They also told us about the quality and choice of food and drink available. This was because this inspection was part of a themed inspection programme to assess whether older people living in care homes were treated with dignity and respect and whether their nutritional needs were met.

The inspection team was led by a CQC inspector joined by an Expert by Experience who has personal experience of using or caring for someone who uses this type of service.

We used the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI). SOFI is a specific way of observing care to help us understand the experience of people who could not talk to us. We spoke to twelve people who used the service.

People expressed their views and were involved in making decisions about their care and treatment. One resident said, �I attend outdoor activities weekly at the local women�s guild.� Another person said the home offered a range of activities and �we can choose to attend these activities or stay in our rooms.�

People who used the service were given appropriate information and support regarding their care or treatment. We asked people whether the information they received before and since admission was helpful. One person�s said �both my family and I have found this information very helpful as it gave us an idea what happens in the home before I got there and I can confirm now all they promise is true.�

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)