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Archived: Specialist Support Services for Younger Adults with Disabilities South Good

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

The provider of this service changed - see new profile

Reports


Inspection carried out on 31 August 2016

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place 31 August 2016 and was announced.

It was carried out by one inspector.

The Specialist Support Services for Younger Adults with Disabilities (South) is a domiciliary care service that provides personal care for younger adults from the age of 18 to 65 years who have a physical disability and / or learning disability and live independently in Northamptonshire. Some people who use the service live in a block of flats where the office is located, others live in their own flats or houses in the surrounding area. On the day of the inspection 26 people were receiving the regulated activity.

There was a registered manger in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People felt safe. Staff had received training to enable them to recognise signs and symptoms of abuse and knew how to report any concerns. People had risk assessments in place to enable them to be as independent as they could be.

There were sufficient staff, with the correct skill mix, on duty to support people with their needs. Effective recruitment processes were in place and followed by the service.

Medicines were managed safely. The processes in place ensured that the administration and handling of medicines was suitable for the people who used the service. People received their medicines safely when they needed them.

Staff received a comprehensive induction process and ongoing training. They were well supported by the registered manager and had regular one to one time for supervisions. Staff had attended a variety of training to ensure they were able to provide care and support based on current practice when supporting people.

People were supported to make decisions about all aspects of their life; this was underpinned by the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards. Staff were knowledgeable of this guidance and correct processes were in place to protect people. Staff gained consent before supporting people.

People were able to make choices about the food and drink they had, and staff gave support when required to enable people to prepare and cook their own meals. People were encouraged to eat a healthy balanced diet.

People were supported to access a variety of health professional when required, including dentist, opticians and doctors.

Staff provided care and support in a caring and meaningful way. They knew the people who used the service. People, and relatives where appropriate, were involved in the planning of their care and support.

People’s privacy and dignity was maintained at all times.

People were supported to follow their interests, join in activities of their choice and encouraged to develop relationships with people.

A complaints procedure was in place and accessible to all. People knew how to complain. Effective quality monitoring systems were in place. A variety of audits were carried out and used to drive improvement.

Inspection carried out on 6 January 2016

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

The Specialist Support Services for Younger Adults with Disabilities (South) is a domiciliary care service that provides personal care for younger adults from the age of 18 to 65 years who have a physical disability and/or learning disability and live independently in Northamptonshire. At the time of our visit there were fifty two people using the service. Nineteen of these lived within the supported living scheme where the service was managed. Others lived in their own homes within the local community. In addition, there were five reablement flats on site where people received short term care for rehabilitation.

We carried out an unannounced comprehensive inspection of this service on 27 July 2015 and found that legal requirements had been breached. After the comprehensive inspection, the provider wrote to us to say what they would do to meet legal requirements in relation to the breaches of Regulation 12 and Regulation 18 of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014.

We undertook this focused inspection to check that they had followed their plan and to confirm that they now met the legal requirements.

This report only covers our findings in relation to these areas. You can read the report from our last comprehensive inspection, by selecting the 'all reports' link for Specialist Support Services for Younger Adults with Disabilities South on our website at www.cqc.org.uk

During this inspection on 6 January 2016, we found that improvements had been made.

The service had a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Systems had been improved to make sure people who used the service received their medicines safely.

Staff had received on-going training to ensure they were qualified, competent and skilled to deliver care or treatment to people who used the service.

Although we found that the service was no longer in breach of legal requirements, we have not changed the rating for the service on this occasion, because to do this this would require consistent good practice over a sustained period of time. We therefore plan to check this area again during our next planned comprehensive inspection.

Inspection carried out on 27 July 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 27 July 2015 and was unannounced.

The Specialist Support Services for Younger Adults with Disabilities (South) is a domiciliary care service that provides personal care for younger adults from the age of 18 to 65 years who have a physical disability and/or learning disability and live independently in Northamptonshire. At the time of our visit there were fifty two people using the service. Nineteen of these lived within the supported living scheme where the service was managed. Others lived in their own homes within the local community. In addition, there were five re-ablement flats on site where people received short term care for rehabilitation.

The service did not have a registered manager. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run. The area manager for the organisation was acting as manager for the service at the time of our inspection.

Systems in place for the safe management of medicines were not appropriate or effective which put people at risk of harm.

Not all staff had received the necessary training to ensure they were qualified, competent and skilled to deliver care or treatment to people who used the service. On-going refresher training had not always been completed by staff when required.

The provider had internal systems in place to monitor the quality and safety of the service but these were not always used as effectively as they could have been.

We saw that risks to people’s safety had been assessed and were linked to care plans which considered risk factors. However, we found that where incidents concerning people’s safety had occurred, their risk assessments had not been reviewed and updated to reflect their current situation.

Not all care plans contained sufficient information for staff to fully meet people’s needs. Records were not up to date and didn’t reflect the current choices people had made.

The service had an effective complaints procedure in place. However, this was not used effectively to make changes and drive improvements to the service.

People were protected from abuse and told us they felt safe. Staff were knowledgeable about the risks of abuse and reporting procedures.

Staffing levels were sufficient to meet people’s needs and keep them safe. Robust recruitment policies and procedures were followed to ensure that staff were suitable to work with people.

People’s consent to care, support and choice was consistently sought in line with best practice guidelines.

People’s nutritional needs had been assessed and they were supported to make choices about their food and drink. People were supported to prepare and cook their own meals.

Staff supported people to attend healthcare appointments and liaised with their GP and other healthcare professionals as required.

Staff communicated effectively with people, responded to their needs promptly and treated them with kindness and compassion.

People had the opportunity to express their views regarding their care and staff supported people to do the things they wanted to do. People’s independence was promoted.

Staff worked hard to ensure they maintained people’s privacy and dignity.

People had been involved in developing their care to ensure it was reflective of their views and opinions.

People were supported to take part in meaningful activities and pursue hobbies and interests.

Staff were positive about the management of the service and felt well supported.

We identified that the provider was not meeting regulatory requirements and was in breach of a number of the Health and Social Care Act 2008 (Regulated Activities) Regulations 2014. You can see what action we told the provider to take at the back of the full version of the report.