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Inspection carried out on 14 February 2018

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 14 February 2018 and was unannounced. This meant the staff and the provider did not know we would be visiting.

Beachcomber Care Home is a ‘care home’. People in care homes receive accommodation and nursing or personal care as a single package under one contractual agreement. CQC regulates both the premises and the care provided, and both were looked at during this inspection.

Beachcomber Care Home accommodates 48 people with residential care needs across two floors. On the day of our inspection there were 43 people using the service. Facilities included several lounges, a dining room, communal bathrooms, shower rooms and toilets, a hairdressing room, a library and a well maintained communal courtyard.

The home had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Beachcomber Care Home was last inspected by CQC on 26 November 2015 and was rated Good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of ‘Good’ and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

The home was clean, spacious and suitable for the people who used the service. The provider had procedures in place for managing the maintenance of the premises and appropriate health and safety checks had been carried out.

Accidents and incidents were appropriately recorded and risk assessments were in place. The registered manager understood their responsibilities with regard to safeguarding and staff had been trained in safeguarding vulnerable adults.

Appropriate arrangements were in place for the safe management and administration of medicines.

The provider had an effective recruitment and selection procedure in place and carried out relevant checks when they employed staff. There were sufficient numbers of staff on duty in order to meet the needs of people who used the service.

Staff were supported to provide care to people who used the service through a range of mandatory and specialised training, supervision and appraisal. Staff said they felt supported by the registered manager.

People who used the service and their relatives were complimentary about the standard of care at Beachcomber Care Home.

Staff treated people with dignity and respect and helped to maintain people’s independence by encouraging them to care for themselves where possible.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible.

Care records showed people’s needs were assessed before they started using the service and care plans were written in a person centred way and were reviewed regularly. Person-centred is about ensuring the person is at the centre of any care or support and their individual wishes, needs and choices are taken into account.

People were protected from the risk of poor nutrition and staff were aware of people’s nutritional needs.

People had access to healthcare services and received ongoing healthcare support. Care plans were in place that recorded people’s plans and wishes for their end of life care.

Activities were arranged for people who used the service based on their likes and interests and to help meet their social needs, in the home and within the local community.

The provider had an effective complaints procedure in place and people who used the service and their relatives were aware of how to make a complaint.

The provider had an effective quality assurance process in place. People who used the service

Inspection carried out on 26 November 2015

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on 26 November 2015 and was unannounced. This meant the staff and the provider did not know we would be visiting. The home had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with CQC to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Beachcomber Care Home (Nursing) was last inspected by CQC on 2 December 2013 and was compliant with the regulations in force at the time.

Beachcomber Care Home (Nursing) is registered to provide accommodation for up to 48 people with nursing or residential needs. The home is located on the seafront in the town of Seaham and is owned and run by A Charles Thomas (Care) Ltd. On the day of our inspection there were 42 people using the service. The home comprised of 48 bedrooms, most of which were en-suite. The home was set in its own grounds with an enclosed courtyard. Facilities included several lounges, a dining room, communal bathrooms and toilets, a hairdressing room and a library.

People who used the service and their relatives were complimentary about the standard of care at Beachcomber Care Home (Nursing). Without exception, everyone we spoke with told us they were happy with the care they were receiving and described staff as very kind and caring.

There were sufficient numbers of staff on duty in order to meet the needs of people using the service. The provider had an effective recruitment and selection procedure in place and carried out relevant checks when they employed staff. Training records were up to date and staff received supervisions and appraisals.

There were appropriate security measures in place to ensure the safety of the people who used the service and the provider had procedures in place for managing the maintenance of the premises.

The layout of the building provided adequate space for people with walking aids or wheelchairs to mobilise safely around the home.

The service was working within the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and any conditions on authorisations to deprive a person of their liberty were being met.

We saw mental capacity assessments had been completed for people and best interest decisions made for their care and treatment. Care records contained evidence of consent.

People were protected against the risks associated with the unsafe use and management of medicines.

People had access to food and drink throughout the day and we saw staff supporting people at meal times when required.

The home had a full programme of activities in place for people who used the service.

All the care records we looked at showed people’s needs were assessed. Care plans and risk assessments were in place when required and daily records were up to date. Care plans were written in a person centred way and were reviewed regularly.

We saw staff used a range of assessment tools and kept clear records about how care was to be delivered. People who used the service had access to healthcare services and received ongoing healthcare support.

The provider had a complaints policy and procedure in place and complaints were fully investigated.

The provider had a robust quality assurance system in place and gathered information about the quality of their service from a variety of sources.

Inspection carried out on 2 December 2013

During a routine inspection

We spoke with ten people out of 42 who use the service and four relatives on

the day of the inspection. Not everyone we spoke to could express their views, but those that could, told us they were very satisfied with the service they received. We found that people were involved in decisions about their care whenever possible.

We found assessment and support plans to help people stay as independent as possible. One person said, “I just could not look after myself like this, so I am very grateful.”

Beachcomber had procedures in place to ensure that medicines were managed appropriately.

We found dedicated and qualified staff, whom had been recruited effectively. One new staff member told us, “Security checks and references had to be completed before I was allowed to start work.”

We found that systems were in place to monitor the quality of service that people received, including for example; people and relative surveys. This showed that the provider sought the views of the people using its service.

Inspection carried out on 4 December 2012

During an inspection to make sure that the improvements required had been made

At the last inspection in March 2012 we found arrangements were not in place to ensure staff were appropriately trained and supervised to enable them to deliver care and treatment safely. We also found the provider was not protecting people from the risks of unsafe or inappropriate care and treatment. This was because people’s personal records, including medical records, were not accurate and fit for purpose.

The provider sent us an action plan following our visit. We returned to inspect again on 04 December 2012 to review improvements the provider had made.

We found people were cared for by staff who were supported to deliver care and treatment safely and to an appropriate standard.

People who used the service could be confident their personal records including medical records were accurate, held securely and remained confidential.

We spoke with a number of people who used the services at Beachcomber. One person said "I love it here” and another person said “I’d be very disappointed if I had to move.” Other people we spoke with indicated to us they were happy to be living there.

People’s needs were assessed and care and treatment was planned and delivered in line with their individual care plan. One person told us "The care is very good” and another person said “You press your buzzer and they (the staff) are there in a matter of minutes.” Everybody we spoke with told us they felt safe at Beachcomber and with the care staff employed by the service.

Inspection carried out on 13 March 2012

During a routine inspection

During the inspection we spoke with four people who used the service and one relative. People who used the service expressed satisfaction with the care and service that they received. Comments made by people who used the service included:

“They are very good. Staff are around to answer my buzzer. They have been very, very good.”

“I get up on a morning about 7:30 which is when I want to get up.”

“They look after me well here.”

“Staff are helpful and always available. They took me to the shower room but I prefer a bath so they took me to the bathroom. I don’t go to the residents meetings but tell the residents representative if I want to raise anything at the meeting.”

We spoke to two relatives during the inspection and one relative told us, “I’ve come to visit my sister for the first time today and everything seems to be fine. They seem to be caring for her well, and they’ve kept me up to date with everything.” Another relative told us, “We can visit anytime. Staff keep us informed about Mams care.”

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)