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Inspection carried out on 5 February 2019

During a routine inspection

Glengarry Court Care Home provides accommodation persons who require nursing or personal care for up to 17 people. The home is situated in Poulton-le-Fylde, a small town close to the Lancashire coast. There are two communal lounges at the home and a dining room on the ground floor. All bedrooms have en-suite facilities. A passenger lift provides access to the first floor. At the time of our inspection visit 12 people were living at Glengarry Court Care Home.

Rating at last inspection

At our last inspection we rated the service good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection. At this inspection we found the service Good. We found the registered provider continued to provide a good standard of care to people who lived at the home.

Why the service is rated Good

At this inspection we found the registered provider had systems to record safeguarding concerns, accidents and incidents and took action following each incident. Staff had received safeguarding training and understood their responsibilities to report unsafe care or abusive practices. The registered provider had reported incidents to the Care Quality Commission when required.

People told us staff were caring and respectful towards them. Staff we spoke with understood the importance of providing high standards of care and enabled people to lead valued lives. One relative told us, “They have given [family member] and me a new lease of life. I don’t feel I need to worry half as much as I did before. They will let me know if she is ever unwell straight away, the communication is great.”

We found there were sufficient numbers of staff during our inspection visit. They were effectively deployed, trained and able to deliver care in a compassionate and patient manner. One person told us, “I do get depressed now and again and they will come and have a chat with me and make me laugh.”

Staff we spoke with confirmed they did not commence in post until the management team completed relevant pre-recruitment checks. We checked staff records and noted employees received induction and training appropriate to their roles.

Risk assessments had been developed to minimise the potential risk of harm to people during the delivery of their care. Care records showed they were reviewed and any changes had been recorded.

We looked around the building and saw the home was clean and a safe place for people to live. We found equipment had been serviced and maintained as required. Staff wore protective clothing such as gloves and aprons when needed. This reduced the risk of cross infection.

Medication records provided staff with a good understanding about specific needs of each person who lived at Glengarry Court Care Home.

People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives and staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible. Policies and systems in the service supported this practice.

People told us they had plenty of food and drink with the option of additional snacks and drinks between meals.

We observed only positive interactions between staff and people who lived Glengarry Court. We observed humour used to foster positive relationships. There was a culture of promoting dignity and respect towards people. We saw staff spent time with people as they completed routine tasks.

There was a complaints procedure which was made available to people and visible within the home. People we spoke with, and visiting relatives, told us they were happy and had no complaints.

The management team used a variety of methods to assess and monitor the quality of the service. These included regular audits, staff meetings, unannounced visits and daily discussions with p

Inspection carried out on 14 June 2016

During a routine inspection

The inspection visit took place on 14 June 2016 and was unannounced.

Glengarry Court Care Home provides accommodation for up to 17 people who require personal care. The home is situated in Poulton-le-Fylde, a small town close to the Lancashire coast. The shopping centre and local amenities are close by. There are two communal lounges at the home and a dining room on the ground floor. All bedrooms have en-suite facilities. A passenger lift provides access to the first floor. At the time of the inspection there were 11 people who lived at the home.

A registered manager was in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

At the last inspection in November 2013 we found the provider was meeting the requirements of the regulations inspected.

At this inspection we found the registered manager had systems in place to record safeguarding concerns, accidents and incidents and take appropriate action when required. Staff had received safeguarding adults training and understood their responsibilities to report any unsafe care.

We found recruitment checks were carried out to ensure suitable people were employed to work at the home and there were sufficient staff to meet people’s needs. This was confirmed by talking with staff members and looking at records of staff recruitment.

Medicines were administered in a safe manner and people received their medicines on time. Staff had received related training to so that medicines were administered correctly by knowledgeable staff. Controlled drugs were being administered at the time of the inspection visit. We found correct documentation was recorded to ensure accurate administration of controlled drugs.

The registered manager understood the requirements of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS). This meant they were working within the law to support people who may lack capacity to make their own decisions.

Staff had received training and were knowledgeable about their roles and responsibilities. Staff told us access to training courses and opportunities to develop their skills was good.

We saw regular snacks and drinks were provided between meals to ensure people received adequate nutrition and hydration. We observed the lunch time meal which was well organised. People who required support to eat their meals were supported by staff who were caring and patient. The cook had information about people’s dietary needs and these were met. One person who lived at the home said about the quality of food, “The food is very good.”

We found people had access to healthcare professionals and their healthcare needs were met. On the day of our inspection visit we saw one person was supported by a staff member to attend a hospital appointment. This ensured the service had up to date information about the outcome of the person’s appointment.

We observed staff treated people with respect, patience and dignity. People we spoke with told us staff were caring and respectful.

There was a complaints policy in place, which was understood by staff. Information on the complaints procedure was available in the reception of the home.

The registered manager used a variety of methods to assess and monitor the quality of the service. We looked at a number of audits that had taken place. This ensured the service continued to be monitored and improvements made when they were identified.

People who lived at the home and relatives had opportunities to feed back to the registered manager about the quality of their care through surveys and meetings.

Inspection carried out on 4 October 2013

During a routine inspection

One person said “We can do what we like to be honest. There’s no need to go to bed at a certain time, and if you want to eat your meals in your room you can do. It’s like a hotel here.” We observed staff being warm and accepting of people. Staff approached people in a sensitive and calm manner and in a way which showed they knew the person well and how best to assist them. We saw people were well presented, they had co-ordinated clothes on, their hair was brushed and they had appropriate foot wear. The registered manager explained that staff were employed as cleaners and housekeepers, and they were responsible for keeping the home clean and tidy. We found the home to clean. One person said “This is our home, and it is always clean and tidy. Staff are always interested in keeping the place spick and span.” People at the home said that they staff were very caring, and attentive to their needs. We found documentary evidence to show that the service provider was involved in the monitoring of the quality of service that people receive. This involved the identification and management of risks to people who used, worked in or visited the service by way of risk assessment, auditing and effective communication.

Inspection carried out on 4 September 2012

During a themed inspection looking at Dignity and Nutrition

People told us what it was like to live at this home and described how they were treated by staff and their involvement in making choices about their care. People also told us about the quality and choice of food and drink available. This was because this inspection was part of a themed inspection programme to assess whether older people living in care homes were treated with dignity and respect and whether their nutritional needs are met.

The inspection team was led by a CQC inspector and an Expert by Experience who has personal experience of using or caring for someone that uses this type of service. We also used the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI). SOFI is a specific way of observing care to help us understand the experiences of people who could not talk with us.

One person who had lived at Glengarry Court for a number of years’ described the home as, “Lovely”. This person said that they felt Glengarry was literally their home and that they would never want to leave. They found staff very polite and respectful. We were told that everybody was treated with great dignity and spoken calmly to by staff.

Another person who had moved to the home comparatively recently said they found staff, “Really polite and respectful, well trained and always calm”. We were told by the same person that the manager had explained everything to them and regularly checked up on how they were finding things.

We were consistently told that there was a good choice of well prepared meals. People said they enjoyed the meals served and had plenty to eat. A number of people also told us that although they did not need any assistance themselves, staff did help others. One person said, “Choice seems to be the norm, not the exception”.

Another person said that they really enjoyed the meals, that were all home made. We were told that it was nice to be served with what they described as, “Lovely food each day”. This same person went on to say that there was plenty of variety and choice of food, food was well presented, hot and tasty. People also told us how much they enjoyed their afternoon tea, including the daily homemade cakes.

Another person described the meals as, “Like living and eating in a hotel“.

One person told us that they felt completely at ease living at the home, and had no fears of abuse at all. They did say however that they would speak up if they felt they needed to. We were told that the manager or home owner always sorted everything out so there was never any reason to complain about anything.

Another person said, “I’m really happy here and in my element, surrounded by lovely staff and people”. This person went on to say that they felt completely safe, happy and relaxed living at the home. They had not needed to complain as everything was to their liking but, “You only had to ask”.

A third person, when questioned if they had ever had a reason to complain or had seen any impatient behaviour toward people replied, “Goodness, absolutely not”. They did however say that they knew who they would complain to if it was ever needed.

Although staff were busy, people told us that they were never rushed or hurried in any way. People spoken with consistently told us that there was always enough staff on duty at all times. People also told us that staff were competent and caring with one person describing the staff team as, “Exemplary”.

Inspection carried out on 30 December 2011

During a routine inspection

This visit took place as part of a programme of CQC visits to health and social care services during the Christmas and New Year holiday period, the purpose being to look at staffing levels and the standard of care provided. Glengarry Court was randomly selected as part of this programme.

We spoke to people residing at the home, the relatives of two people who were visiting, the manager and a member of staff.

Residents told us that they are well cared for, that staff are kind and helpful

and that activities take place. People also told us that they had very much enjoyed the Christmas festivities. We spoke with residents about the availability of staff at the home and were told that there are always enough staff on duty. People also confirmed that, if needed, staff come quickly during the night. Comments included; “We are spoiled” and “You only have to ask and it’s done.”

The relatives we spoke to told us that staff are always available when they visit, that they were involved in the assessment process, that staff are approachable and that they were highly satisfied with the care provided at Glengarry Court.

Reports under our old system of regulation (including those from before CQC was created)