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Radis Community Care (Ness Court ECH) Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 19 October 2018

During a routine inspection

Radis Community Care (Ness Court ECH) provides care and support to older people living in a specialist ‘extra care’ housing scheme. Extra care housing is purpose-built or adapted single household accommodation in a shared site or building. The accommodation is bought or rented, and is the occupant’s own home. People’s care and housing are provided under separate contractual agreements. CQC does not regulate premises used for extra care housing; this inspection looked at people’s personal care and support service.

Not everyone using Radis Community Care (Ness Court ECH) receives the regulated activity of personal care. CQC only inspects the service being received by people provided with personal care, help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also take into account any wider social care provided.

This announced inspection took place on 19 October 2018. At the time of this inspection, 20 people received the regulated activity, personal care.

At our last inspection we rated the service good. At this inspection we found the evidence continued to support the rating of good and there was no evidence or information from our inspection and ongoing monitoring that demonstrated serious risks or concerns. This inspection report is written in a shorter format because our overall rating of the service has not changed since our last inspection.

There was a registered manager in post. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

People were protected from avoidable harm by a staff team trained and confident to recognise and report any concerns. Staff assessed and minimised potential risks. Staff were only employed after satisfactory pre-employment checks had been obtained. There were enough staff to ensure people’s needs were met safely and in a timely manner.

People were supported to manage their prescribed medicines by staff who were trained and had been assessed as competent to administer medicines. Staff followed the provider’s procedures to prevent the spread of infection and reduce the risk of cross contamination.

People’s care was planned and delivered in line with good practice guidance. Staff knew the people they cared for well and understood, and met, their needs. People received care from staff who were trained, well supported, and had the skills and knowledge to meet people’s assessed needs.

People were supported by staff to have enough to eat and drink. People were assisted to have access to external healthcare services to help maintain their health and well-being.

Staff understood and complied with the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA). People were supported to have maximum choice and control of their lives. Staff supported them in the least restrictive way possible; the policies and systems in the home supported this practice. People were fully involved in making decisions about their care and support. People and their relatives were involved in the setting up and review of their or their family member’s individual support and care plans.

Staff treated people kindly and made people feel that they mattered. Staff respected and promoted people’s privacy, dignity and independence.

People’s personal and health care needs were met and care records provided staff with clear, detailed guidance in how to do this. Staff supported people to take part in past-times and hobbies they enjoyed. Staff supported people to consider their end of life care to ensure they had the most comfortable, dignified, and pain-free a death as possible. Staff worked in partnership with other professionals to ensure that people received joined-up care.

People’s suggestions and complaints were listened to, investiga

Inspection carried out on 18 January 2016

During a routine inspection

Radis Community Care (Ness Court) is registered to provide personal care to people living in their own homes. During this inspection personal care was provided to 13 people, all of whom lived within the extra care housing scheme of Ness Court.

The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

This announced comprehensive inspection was undertaken on 18 January 2016.

Staff were only employed after the provider carried out satisfactory pre-employment checks. Staff were trained and well supported by their managers. There were sufficient staff to meet people’s assessed needs.

Systems were in place to ensure people’s safety was effectively managed. Staff were aware of the procedures for reporting concerns and took action to reduce the risk of people experiencing harm.

People’s health and personal needs were effectively met. Systems were in place to safely support people with the management of their medicines. People received their prescribed medicines appropriately.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) is required by law to monitor the operation of the Mental Capacity Act 2005 (MCA) and the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) and report on what we find. People’s rights to make decisions about their care were respected. Staff were acting in accordance with the Mental Capacity Act 2005 so that people’s rights were being promoted.

People received care and support from staff who were kind, caring and respectful. Staff respected people’s privacy and dignity and offered reassurance when people needed it. People were encouraged to express their views on the service provided.

People were encouraged to provide feedback on the service in various ways both formally and informally. People, and their relatives, were involved in their care assessments and reviews. Care records were detailed and provided staff with sufficient guidance to enable them to provide consistent care that met each person’s needs. Changes to people’s care was kept under review to ensure the change was effective.

The registered manager managed three other services in addition to this one. The registered manager was supported by a team leader and care workers. People felt listened to and the registered manager used their feedback, together with audits of the service to drive improvement.

The service was well run. People told us that all staff, including the registered manager, were approachable. People’s views were listened to and acted on.