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Prompt Healthcare Staffing Limited Good

Reports


Inspection carried out on 14 August 2018

During a routine inspection

This inspection took place on the 14 August 2018 and was announced. At the previous inspection of this service in March 2016 we did not find any breaches of regulations. However, as they only had one person using the service at that time, we found insufficient evidence to give the service a rating.

This service is a domiciliary care agency. It provides personal care to people living in their own houses and flats. It is registered to provide a service to children 13-18 years old, people living with dementia, people with learning disabilities or autistic spectrum disorder, people with mental health needs, older people, people who misuse drugs and alcohol, people with an eating disorder, people with a physical disability or sensory impairment and younger adults.

Not everyone using Prompt Healthcare Staffing receives regulated activity; CQC only inspects the service being received by people provided with ‘personal care’; help with tasks related to personal hygiene and eating. Where they do we also take into account any wider social care provided. Thirty-seven people were receiving support with personal care at the time of our inspection.

The service had a registered manager in place. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Appropriate safeguarding procedures were in place and people told us they felt safe using the service. Risk assessments provided information about how to support people in a safe manner. There were enough staff working at the service to meet people's needs and robust staff recruitment procedures were in place. Staff had a good understanding about infection control issues and used protective clothing to help prevent the spread of infection. People were supported with medicines in a safe way.

The service carried out an assessment of people’s needs prior to the provision of care. This enabled the service to determine if it was a suitable care provider for each individual. Staff undertook an induction training programme on commencing work at the service and had access to regular on-going training to help them develop relevant skills and knowledge. Where people required support with meal preparation, they were able to choose what they ate and drank. The service operated within the principles of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. The service supported people to access health care professionals and staff were aware of what to do if a person faced a medical emergency.

People were supported by the same regular care staff so they were able to build good relationships. People were treated in a caring and respectful manner by staff and were supported to maintain their independence. The right to confidentiality was taken seriously by the service and staff understood the importance of this.

Care plans were in place which set out how to meet people’s individual needs and these were subject to review. The service worked closely with other agencies to meet people’s needs in relation to end of life care. The service had a complaints procedure in place and people knew how to make a complaint.

People and staff spoke positively about the registered manager. Systems were in place for monitoring the quality of support provided at the service. Some of these included seeking the views of people who used the service. The registered manager networked with other agencies to help develop their knowledge and to improve the quality of support provided to people.

Inspection carried out on 4 March 2016

During a routine inspection

The inspection took place on 4 March 2016. This was an announced inspection. The provider was informed 48 hours in advance of our visit. This was to ensure there was somebody at the location to facilitate our inspection. This was the first inspection of the service since it was registered with the Care Quality Commission. The service provides support with personal care to adults living in their own homes. One person was using the service at the time of our inspection.

There was a registered manager at the service. A registered manager is a person who has registered with the Care Quality Commission to manage the service. Like registered providers, they are ‘registered persons’. Registered persons have legal responsibility for meeting the requirements in the Health and Social Care Act 2008 and associated Regulations about how the service is run.

Systems were in place to ensure that people using the service were safe. Staff had undertaken training about safeguarding adults and had a good understanding about safeguarding principles and how to raise an alert. Risk assessments were carried out but were not detailed or robust.

Staff were aware of their responsibilities under the Mental Capacity Act 2005 and how to ensure people using the service were given support to make decisions.

There were enough staff to carry out the required level of care to meet the needs of people using the service.

Staff received relevant training for their role and records showed recruitment processes were robust. Relevant checks had been carried out before staff commenced employment.

Care was personalised and people were involved in their care planning and decision making.

The registered manager had a good relationship with staff and people using the service and their relatives. There was open communication between all parties. The service had quality assurance systems in place.

We have made a recommendation that the service reviews how they complete and record risk assessments and undertake additional training in this area for everyone working at the service.