You are here

Archived: Bspoke social care

This service is now registered at a different address - see new profile

All reports

Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 30 December 2013
Date of Publication: 28 January 2014
Inspection Report published 28 January 2014 PDF | 74.82 KB

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 30 December 2013, talked with carers and / or family members and talked with staff.

Our judgement

Before people received any care they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

Reasons for our judgement

We found the provider had effective systems to involve people in planning their care, and obtaining people’s consent for this to be provided. We saw there was an entry in a person’s care file that stated the person had the mental capacity to make decisions about their daily life. This included how the care and support they required was provided. It was recorded in the file the person was unable to provide written consent due to their physical disability. We asked a person who used the service in a text message, “Were you involved in preparing your care plan?” The person replied by text, “Yes.”

The provider may find it useful to note that the care plans prepared had a section for the person to sign to show their agreement with these. However as the person was unable to do so, these had not been altered to show the person had given consent in a way they were able to.

A relative told us, “They involved [NAME] when they made the care plans, they were good at that.” The relative also told us their relation, “Gets on really well with them, she would be able to say if she wanted things done differently.” We asked a person who used the service in a text message, “Did you feel your views about how you wanted to be supported were listened to and taken into account?” The person replied by text, “Yes.”

The Mental Capacity Act (2005) and Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (2007) is legislation used to protect people who might not be able to make informed decisions on their own about the care they receive. The manager told us they did not support anyone who did not have the capacity to make decisions about the care and support they required and would not do so at present, although they may consider doing so in the future.

A senior support worker told us they understood the principles of the Mental Capacity Act (2005) and the person who used the service had the right to make decisions for themselves. They said they discussed with the person what they wanted to do, and said the person always made the decision.