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Archived: Abbeywood Outstanding

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 3 July 2013
Date of Publication: 26 July 2013
Inspection Report published 26 July 2013 PDF

There should be enough members of staff to keep people safe and meet their health and welfare needs (outcome 13)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Are safe and their health and welfare needs are met by sufficient numbers of appropriate staff.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 3 July 2013, observed how people were being cared for and checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care. We talked with people who use the service, talked with carers and / or family members and talked with staff.

We used the Short Observational Framework for Inspection (SOFI). SOFI is a specific way of observing care to help us understand the experience of people who could not talk with us.

Our judgement

There were enough qualified, skilled and experienced staff to meet people’s needs.

Reasons for our judgement

There were enough qualified, skilled and experienced staff to meet people's needs.

The service is registered to accommodate up to 52 people, however on the day of our visit there were 42 people residing in the home. We asked the registered manager as to how they deployed staff in the home. They told us

people’s needs and dependency levels were looked at whilst formulating the rosters and where dependency was high then more staff had been allocated.

The registered manager talked about staff deployment and the need for a dependency needs analysis and staff skill mix to ensure resources were used appropriately. For example, where people displayed challenging behaviours more staff had been allocated to the unit. We noted less staff on units where people were more able. This meant the registered manager had carried out a risk assessment as the basis for deciding sufficient staffing levels.

We spoke with two people who could express a view. One told us "Oh yes the staff are good, but they are always so busy." Another person said "They do try their best to look after everybody well and it’s a hard job". One of the relatives we spoke with said "There are always enough when I visit and I visit regularly during the week and at weekends.”

We looked at the staffing roster for the month of May 2013. We saw that seven to eight care workers and two team leaders had been on duty between the hours of 07.30 to 20.30. We also noted three care workers and one team leader had been on duty during the night shift. During our visit observed that there were eight care workers and two team leaders on the early shift. We also noted there were housekeepers/cleaners, a laundry person a maintenance person, a chef and two kitchen assistants on duty. The registered manager also informed us the care manager on duty during the day and that this person was available to provide assistance to people as and staff as and when required. This was confirmed by staff we spoke with.

We asked the registered manager if the service used any agency staff. They told they did not, but used their own bank of staff to cover shifts in the event of staff shortages. This was confirmed by staff we spoke with. This meant the registered manager responded to unexpected changing circumstances to ensure people's needs were met and continuity of care was maintained.

We were in the home from 9.00am until 14.30pm and spent a considerable amount of time observing care. During this time staff did not appear to be overstretched and people were seen to receive their care in a timely manner. This meant people benefited from sufficient staff to meet their needs