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Langley Lodge Residential Home Good

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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 22 April 2013
Date of Publication: 9 May 2013
Inspection Report published 9 May 2013 PDF | 83.38 KB

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 22 April 2013, observed how people were being cared for and checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care. We talked with people who use the service, talked with carers and / or family members and talked with staff.

We carried out a tour of the premises.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. Where people did not have the capacity to consent, the provider acted in accordance with legal requirements.

Reasons for our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. Where people did not have the capacity to consent, the provider generally acted in accordance with legal requirements.

People who we spoke with said that they gave their consent to their support and care. They also told us that their rights to make choices about when they wanted to get up and go to bed and the clothes that they wanted to wear, were respected.

Representatives of a person living at the home told us that they were actively consulted in the decision making process about the support, care and medical treatment provided to their relative.

There was a system in place to record a person’s decision about their end-of-life care. However, the provider may wish to note that from our examination of four out of 20 sets of people’s care records, not all people had their end-of-life wishes recorded.

From speaking with senior staff and examination of one person’s care records, we noted that people were supported, if needed, to have access to an independent mental capacity advisor.

Senior members of staff told us that people’s mental capacity assessments were carried out by external agencies, including local authority care managers and GPs. However, the provider may wish to note that there was no documented or reported evidence found to indicate there was an internal system in place to confirm that people’s mental capacity was assessed. This included mental capacity assessments to make a valid decision, or otherwise, to have their whereabouts monitored as a safety measure by means of specialist equipment.

To ensure that people consented to live at Langley Lodge Residential Home, there was an assessment system in place to ensure that their liberty was not unlawfully restricted.