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Archived: Allied Healthcare - Cambridge

This service was previously registered at a different address - see old profile

All reports

Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 10 April 2014
Date of Publication: 7 May 2014

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 10 April 2014, observed how people were being cared for and checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care. We talked with people who use the service, talked with carers and / or family members, talked with staff and reviewed information given to us by the provider.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes. Where people did not have the capacity to consent, the provider acted in accordance with legal requirements.

Reasons for our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

We looked at the provider's records for staff's training for situations where people lacked or were at risk of not having the mental capacity to consent to their care. We saw that staff had received training for these situations including that for people living with dementia and an awareness of the Mental Capacity Act 2005. This meant that people were assured that they would only be provided with care and support that they had agreed to or where it was in their best interests.

All five care plans we looked at had been signed by the person or their relative that they had agreed to their care and support. This included consent to sharing information, administering medication and managing the person's finances. One person said, "They know me so well, I don't have to tell them what to do. If I ever had a problem with the care I would tell them to stop." The same person told us that that they had never had to say 'No' to their care.

All of the staff we spoke with were able to tell us the action they would take if a person's ability to provide a valid implied, verbal or written consent changed. For example, if a person's health condition changed or that their behaviours were out of character. We saw that the provider had procedures in place to ensure that they only acted in accordance with, the consent of people who used the service, or the consent of a representative or relative. Where people did not have the capacity to consent, the provider had acted in accordance with legal requirements.

Care plans we looked at included information where people could make advance decisions about their end of life care. We saw that people had not yet completed these forms or had not yet decided on their advanced wishes and decisions. People's wishes were respected.