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The Georgians (Boston) Limited - 50 Wide Bargate Boston Good

All reports

Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 3 February 2012
Date of Publication: 8 March 2012
Inspection Report published 8 March 2012 PDF

People should be treated with respect, involved in discussions about their care and treatment and able to influence how the service is run (outcome 1)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Understand the care, treatment and support choices available to them.
  • Can express their views, so far as they are able to do so, and are involved in making decisions about their care, treatment and support.
  • Have their privacy, dignity and independence respected.
  • Have their views and experiences taken into account in the way the service is provided and delivered.

How this check was done

Our judgement

People are generally involved in making choices about their lives and are respected although there are some inconsistencies in practice.

User experience

All the people we spoke with told us they were happy with the care they received and staff treated them with dignity and respect. One person said “I am given the opportunity to make choices like what clothes I want to wear.” This person also commented that staff respected their privacy and dignity and when we saw that staff knocked the door before they went into their room they told us that “Staff always do that.”

A relative we spoke with said that their loved one was always given privacy and dignity when it was needed. Another person told us they had their choices respected by the staff, for example accepting that they did not want to go into the communal lounges and preferred to stay in their room.

The people we spoke with also told us that they were encouraged to do as much for themselves as they could to remain as independent as possible and that care staff always explained things to them and helped them when it was needed.

Two members of staff we spoke with told us that helping the people who lived in the home to make their own choices was important. They told us how they did that, for example giving them choices about what they ate and what they wore each day. They told us they respected their decisions.

The two relatives we spoke with told us they had visited the home before their loved ones were admitted to make sure they were happy with it. They both told us they had been impressed with the care they saw and the information they had been given. However, when we sat and watched the care being delivered to people in one of the lounges we saw that two members of staff did not acknowledge or speak with them when they entered the lounge or did tasks for them.

Other evidence

Two members of staff we spoke with told us that helping the people who live in the home to make their own choices was important. They told us how they did that, for example giving them choices about what time they got up and went to bed. They told us they respected their decisions.

We saw that a copy of the complaints procedure was kept in each care plan which was kept in people’s rooms so they or their relative could see it.

People’s care plans showed evidence of their involvement, or that of their relative, in the planning of care. The care plans also showed a list of likes or dislikes for that person, for example types of food they enjoyed or did not like.