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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 17 January 2014
Date of Publication: 18 February 2014
Inspection Report published 18 February 2014 PDF

People should get safe and coordinated care when they move between different services (outcome 6)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Receive safe and coordinated care, treatment and support where more than one provider is involved, or they are moved between services.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 17 January 2014, observed how people were being cared for and checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care. We talked with people who use the service, talked with carers and / or family members and talked with staff.

Our judgement

People’s health, safety and welfare was protected when more than one provider was involved in their care and treatment, or when they moved between different services. This was because the provider worked in co-operation with others.

Reasons for our judgement

We reviewed the care records of three people who used the service. We saw that each file contained information about involvement from a range of agencies including, general practitioners, social workers and involvement from psychiatric services.

Within each of the three sets of records we looked at, we saw that ‘Pre-Admission Assessments’ were carried out by the home. We looked at this documentation and found that information was shared between local authorities and service providers prior to the person moving into the service.

We saw that the information shared included healthcare information (including details of current medication requirements) and background, and capabilities and risk profiles. We also saw that life history, including family and next of kin information was shared and that the information which detailed their routines, likes / dislikes and preferences were shared.

We saw from records and from discussions with people that a range of professionals were involved in the care of people who used the service. There was evidence of involvement of general practitioners, dentists, chiropodists and opticians. We also saw that where appropriate staff ensured referrals were made to tissue viability nurses, dieticians, specialist consultants, the challenging behaviour service, the local falls team and wheelchair services.

One relative we spoke with told us that they were very happy with the way in which the home responded to their relative’s needs. They told us, “They identified a rash and arranged for the GP to make a referral to the dermatologist, they were very quick to react.”

This meant that people’s health, safety and welfare was protected when more than one provider was involved in their care and support, or when they moved between different services. This was because the provider worked in co-operation with others.