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Inspection report

Date of Inspection: 25 April 2014
Date of Publication: 29 August 2014
Inspection Report published 29 August 2014 PDF

Before people are given any examination, care, treatment or support, they should be asked if they agree to it (outcome 2)

Meeting this standard

We checked that people who use this service

  • Where they are able, give valid consent to the examination, care, treatment and support they receive.
  • Understand and know how to change any decisions about examination, care, treatment and support that has been previously agreed.
  • Can be confident that their human rights are respected and taken into account.

How this check was done

We looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service, carried out a visit on 25 April 2014, observed how people were being cared for and checked how people were cared for at each stage of their treatment and care. We talked with people who use the service, talked with staff and reviewed information given to us by the provider.

Our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

Reasons for our judgement

Before people received any care or treatment they were asked for their consent and the provider acted in accordance with their wishes.

We saw that care plans contained consent forms that people who used the service signed to give and record their consent to care and treatment.

We noted that these consent forms ensured that consent was sought and recorded for people who had the capacity to consent. The manager told us they would have to appropriately assess about a quarter of the people who used the service to determine their capacity. Then they would be able to obtain consent either directly from the person, or through a best interest meeting, depending on the outcome of the assessment.

We found that where a person may not have capacity, the service had suitable arrangements in place to establish capacity to consent, This meant that the service could not act in accordance with the best interests of the person and in line with the Mental Capacity Act (MCA) 2005.

Staff had undertaken training in the MCA and we saw records that confirmed this.